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Confederate statues in Maryland: What they're saying

Baltimore leaders are in support of removing four monuments linked to the Confederacy, and some state leaders are pushing harder to remove another statue from just outside the State House in Annapolis after racially-charged protests in Charlotte turned deadly Saturday.

Baltimore's City Council is set to weigh legislation Monday night regarding the removal of statues in the city, and Mayor Catherine Pugh supports the idea.

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Brandon Scott said Sunday he intends to push a resolution during the meeting.

Some city residents don't want to see the monuments simply removed. They want them to no longer exist.

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In an early Monday blog post, Baltimore Sun columnist Dan Rodricks has some ideas as to how Pugh could handle the statues.

Ben Jealous, former NAACP president and a candidate for governor in Maryland, said, "If we're going to have statues of 19th century leaders, … better to define our state by those who look forward, then those who sought to hold us all back."

He also seemed to like one of Rodricks' suggestions about how to handle the Taney statue in Baltimore.

Taney is the subject of a statue in Annapolis, too, and one of the most debated monuments in the state. Set just outside the State House, the statue has been the topic of a number of activists who want it removed. Taney, once a Maryland legislator was the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court who issued the ruling in the Dred Scott case.

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The state's attorney general weighed in on Tuesday.

Twitter: @seanjwelsh

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