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Daylight saving time ends at 2 a.m. Sunday, in case 2020 didn’t already feel like the movie ‘Groundhog Day’

Just what we wanted: another hour of 2020.

Daylight saving time ends at 2 a.m. Sunday, meaning that you’ll need to adjust the clock on your coffee maker, stove, microwave, and anything that isn’t your smartphone, which should just update automatically. You know: Fall back, spring forward.

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The change means that the sun will set tomorrow at 5:05 p.m.

Falling back an hour can disrupt the body’s internal clock. Rather than enjoy an extra hour of shut-eye, many people just get worse sleep for a few days. Some people may even be at higher risk for heart attacks on account of the disruption, research has shown.

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The change can even impact animals. In 2018, dairy farmer Katie Dotterer-Pyle told the Carroll County Times that her cows produced less milk and were “moody” after the clocks changed in spring.

Why do we do this to ourselves?

The idea of daylight saving originated in Europe during World War I as a means to reduce the need for artificial lighting and to save fuel for the war effort. The United States adopted it in 1918 and formalized the change across time zones with The Uniform Time Act of 1966.

In 2005, The Energy Policy Act extended daylight saving time. It now runs from the second Sunday in March to the first Sunday in November.

According to Michael Downing, author of “Spring Forward: The Annual Madness of Daylight Saving Time,” that happened thanks to lobbying by the candy industry, which wanted the extra hour of daylight on Halloween to increase trick-or-treating, and therefore, candy sales.

Researchers have suggested that making daylight saving time permanent could prevent violent crimes that happen at night — and save the country billions in social costs.

Since 2015, 45 states have proposed legislation to either exempt themselves from the practice altogether or making daylight saving time permanent, according to a report from the Congressional Research Service.

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