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Towson High fields to add home-run fences

Dulaney's Tyler Pillas, right, slides safely into second base as Towson second baseman John Davis covers in the third inning of a high school baseball game.
Dulaney's Tyler Pillas, right, slides safely into second base as Towson second baseman John Davis covers in the third inning of a high school baseball game. (Steve Ruark / Baltimore Sun Media Group)

When Towson High School's baseball and softball teams take to their fields next spring, both will have outfield fences for the first time.

The Towson High School Sports Boosters Club raised the $1,800 needed to purchase a fence for the school's baseball team this month. The club raised about $1,500 for a similar fence for the separate softball field in the spring by holding a car wash, according to Athletic Director Justin Nash.

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The club asked the community for donations for the baseball fence using the crowd-funding website GoFundMe.com, a conduit for online donations. The club launched the fundraiser Nov. 14 and raised enough money in about six days, according to Scott Bayne, a club member and father of baseball players who launched the effort.

"It's pretty amazing to see what the community and players can do when they work together," Nash said.

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The 5-foot-tall fences with green plastic mesh and yellow trim, are 300 feet down the first- and third-base lines from home plate for baseball and 200 feet for softball, and will enhance both programs, Nash said.

After observing what one school mentor had started, Towson High School Parent Teacher Student Association President Cheri Pegues has brought a countywide food supplement program called Food For Thought Baltimore County to the school, which provides a free bag of food each week to students identified by school officials as in need.

Before the fence, a baseball player who hit the ball 330 feet might only get to second base before an outfielder could reach the ball, where as with the fence that hit would be a home run, Bayne said.

The fundraiser was particularly meaningful for Bayne, an alumnus of the Towson High School baseball program, who has a son in the program now, and a second son headed to the school next year. Both sons have been playing baseball from a young age, Bayne said.

"I know others have worked very hard to make sure that baseball is always something players can be proud to be a part of," Bayne said.

The baseball fence will be purchased as soon as possible, Nash said. The softball fence was purchased earlier this year.

The fences can be moved, as other sports use the fields. Nash said the fences should be in place in time for the start of baseball season March 1.



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