xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Towson neighborhoods treated for rats

A dead rat lies in an alleyway in August as Lionel Van Dommelen, Baltimore County's Chief of Code Enforcement and Inspection walks through a Towson neighborhood.
A dead rat lies in an alleyway in August as Lionel Van Dommelen, Baltimore County's Chief of Code Enforcement and Inspection walks through a Towson neighborhood. (File photo)

Several neighborhoods in Towson and Loch Raven Village have been designated for county rat eradication, but county officials remind residents that results might not be immediately visible.

"Just because they saw a rat after treatment, this is not a 100 percent, get-'em-all treatment," Lionel Van Dommelen, Baltimore County's Chief of Code Enforcement and Inspection, said last week. "It's a multi-pronged approach, the treatment is just one facet of it."

Advertisement

Even for areas in which the treatment is effective, Van Dommelen said dead rats would not be strewn in the streets.

"As they start to feel ill over the course of four or five days, they stay in their burrows," he said.

Advertisement

If residents in neighborhoods that were swept still see rats, Van Dommelen said the way to get rid of them is to eliminate their food population.

"The population is going to grow or shrink with the available food," he said. "You're going to find rats wherever you find people. You'll never totally eliminate them."

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement