xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Steady stream of voters casting ballots in Towson

A steady stream of voters turned out Election Day on Tuesday at polling place Towson High School to cast their ballots in a contentious midterm election, with many big races at stake both locally and statewide.

Maryland's gubernatorial race, perhaps the most watched race this election, has been deemed a toss-up, a split reflected in speaking to some Towson voters.

Advertisement

"To be perfectly honest, it was more the negativity I've seen the last couple of years with [Lt. Gov. Anthony] Brown and [Gov. Martin O'Malley]," said Jerry Todd, of Knollwood-Donnybrook, about voting for Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan as he left the polls at Towson High early Tuesday.

Though Brown was frequently criticized by Republicans for his management of the state's troubled health insurance marketplace, Julia Krieger, of Idlewylde, was more willing to forgive the lieutenant governor saying she didn't trust Hogan to manage implementation of the Affordable Care Act. She said her husband, Ethan, and infant daughter, Brooke, would not have health coverage if not for the federally mandated marketplaces.

Advertisement
Advertisement

"Ultimately, that was an issue with the contracting firm," Krieger said. "After recognizing the issue, [state officials] tried to fix it as quickly as possible."

Turnout seemed light at Towson High, likely impacted by early voting, which ran Oct. 23-30, and one of eight polling places was just around the corner at Towson University. Preliminary numbers showed Baltimore County had the highest number of voters turn out for early voting.

One of those who voted early was Democrat Del. Steve Lafferty, running for reelection to the Maryland House of Delegates representing District 42A. He is running against Republican Michael McAllister. Tuesday morning, however, Lafferty was talking to voters outside his designated polling place at Stoneleigh Elementary School.

"One nice thing about working the poll where you live is you get to see a lot of people," Lafferty said, who said he thought turnout Tuesday was better than turnout in the primary election June 24.

Advertisement

Another watched race in the Towson area that for the state Senate seat representing District 42 pitting incumbent Sen. Jim Brochin against newcomer Dr. Tim Robinson, a Republican. Because of state redistricting that left his northern Baltimore County district with considerably more Republicans, Brochin, a 12-year incumbent Democrat, was in the toughest race of his political career. Towson voters were split on this race, too, on Election Day.

"I think [Brochin] does a good job for the community and he seems forthright on the issues," said John Pilotte, of Northwood.

Though Brochin is known for his independent streak, calling himself the most independent member of the state Senate, Tristan Hiemstra, of Fellowship Forest, voted for Robinson after a couple of Brochin's votes on big issues turned her away.

"I've met Brochin a couple of times and I think he's a decent person, but I don't like that he voted for the gun bill," Hiemstra said. "I don't like the rain tax. I don't like any of the things his cronies put through."

Another candidate, like Lafferty, making the rounds of polling places was County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, who faces Republican George Harman in the general election. He dropped by Stoneleigh briefly Tuesday to chat with voters and thank volunteers.

"They may not be happy with things in Annapolis or Washington, but they recognize the things we've done in Baltimore County," Kamenetz said.

Unlike Lafferty, Kamenetz didn't vote early.

"I'm a traditionalist. I like doing it on Election Day," he said. "I don't like to jinx my track record."

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement