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Three-sport athlete Kolby Weedon is Catonsville/Arbutus Times Female co-Athlete of the Year

Catonsville's Kolby Weedon winds up for a shot on goal during the Baltimore County girls lacrosse championship against Hereford in 2019.
Catonsville's Kolby Weedon winds up for a shot on goal during the Baltimore County girls lacrosse championship against Hereford in 2019. (Brian Krista / Baltimore Sun Media Group)

When Kolby Weedon came to Catonsville High as a freshman, she made an immediate impact for every one of her coaches in soccer, basketball and lacrosse.

She made varsity in all three sports and the 2020 graduate continued to amaze coaches and fans as the years progressed.

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That earned her the selection as the 2020 Catonsville/Arbutus Times Female co-Athlete of the Year.

She shares the award with Sophi Wrisk, who also won the award in 2019.

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Soccer coach Ricky Sanchez was the first to see the talented athlete make her debut at Catonsville High in 2016.

“I still remember her first day of tryouts and she was that star that stood out,” said Sanchez, who was watching with former soccer coach and athletic director James Fitzpatrick and others. “They knew her from her sister Amber and they were like immediately, ‘She is going to be on varsity,' and I was like, ‘What?’ and within like a few minutes of watching her, it was absolutely no doubt.”

At the postseason soccer coaches meeting to select All-County teams, Sanchez talked up his talented player.

“Soccer coaches since her freshman year have heard me talk about how amazing an athlete she is and there are things that she can do that no one can do,” he said. “All those coaches knew who I was talking about. She had an incredible reputation.”

Catonsville's Kolby Weedon shows off a bicycle kick during her junior year in a game against Loch Raven. Weedon is the 2020 Catonsville/Arbutus Times co-Female Athlete of the Year.
Catonsville's Kolby Weedon shows off a bicycle kick during her junior year in a game against Loch Raven. Weedon is the 2020 Catonsville/Arbutus Times co-Female Athlete of the Year. (Jen Rynda / Baltimore Sun Media Group)

Sanchez marveled at the way she dedicated herself on the soccer field despite committing to the University of Maryland to play lacrosse, before later de-committing and selecting Saint Joseph’s University, PA, as her college designation.

“I’ve always appreciated every player that played for me knowing that there was another sport that was there number one,” Sanchez said. “She treated each sport like it was her number one.”

Weedon admits she will miss playing soccer in college.

“I always thought about playing soccer in college and how much fun it would be and I honestly missed it,” Weedon said. “I mean, if I could, I would play lacrosse and soccer in college.”

Although she prefers playing striker or midfield, Weedon played central defender last fall because the team needed her there.

“Defense was fun, I gave coach Ricky a hard time about it because he knew I hated it,” said Weedon, who scored 10 goals and added three assists last fall. “Maybe it was just the change because I wasn’t used to it because I had never played defense before.”

Sanchez didn’t hesitate moving her off the back line if the situation dictated it.

“I’d say her biggest output was against Parkville in our first playoff game,” Sanchez said. “I put her up top and it paid off big time, immediately, and it was a wrinkle because she made plays that very few girls at that level could make.”

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The Comets won that second round playoff game, 7-0, but lost to Perry Hall in the next round.

Sanchez also marveled at the dynamic athlete in practice.

“There are some training exercises or skills that she would do in soccer practice that carry over into basketball and she jumped through the ceiling to make a play and I would say that’s incredible, no one else on this field could do that right now,” Sanchez said.

Basketball coach Mike Mohler certainly saw how her athleticism morphed onto the basketball court.

“Some of the things that she would do athletically on the floor would just make your head spin,” Mohler said. “She had incredible leaping ability, incredible nose for the ball and just incredible athleticism.”

Weedon played for the state Class 4A state championship team in 2017 and the state finalists in 2018 and savored everything.

“I was taking in every moment, being that young, in high school and just having that experience is amazing and the atmosphere at states was incredible, just the support and everything,” she said. “Even when we lost, it was still fun to me, having the opportunity to go.”

She didn’t play basketball as a junior and ran on the indoor track team, but returned to the court as a senior and Mohler welcomed her with open arms.

“I was so thrilled when I heard she was coming back and when she did come back it really made us a lot better,” said Mohler, noting she averaged 4.7 points, 4.1 rebounds and 3.3 steals per game. “Towards the end of the year, she was real close to being the best player on the floor many, many, many times.”

Catonsville's Kolby Weedon wasn't afraid to mix it up inside as she did here against Woodlawn during her senior year.
Catonsville's Kolby Weedon wasn't afraid to mix it up inside as she did here against Woodlawn during her senior year. (Baltimore Sun Media Group)

Stats were sometimes overshadowed by her ability to maneuver her body to get a rebound over taller players or fly through the air to save a ball from going out of bounds.

“I try to be as aggressive as I can and just pour my heart into the game and make sure we win as long as everyone is working hard,” Weedon said. “I don’t even think about it, it just happens, honestly.”

“She was just a pure athlete with a terrific attitude and just a terrific nature about her,” Mohler said.

During her freshman year of basketball she fractured the growth plate in her ankle and missed two months and the extended basketball season ran into the start of lacrosse practice.

That’s where her older sister, goalie Amber, helped make her transition easier.

“Just having her support and having her push me through it all and telling me everything was going to be fine and turn out the way I wanted, I’m really thankful for that,” said Kolby, who will join her older sister at St. Joe’s.

That’s one reason she decided to switch her commitment to St. Joe’s.

“The reason I de-committed was just because honestly Maryland was a bigger school and I realized I wanted a smaller school, along with the potential of growth I’ll have at St. Joe’s and just the immediate impact, and obviously having the opportunity to play alongside my sister again,” she said.

Although this year’s Comet lacrosse team never played a regular-season game because the coronavirus pandemic closed schools, she did play in one scrimmage against Bel Air.

“Sophi and I came in straight from basketball so we weren’t at tryouts, so we came in and the way we connected, in my eyes, I thought we were going far this year,” said Weedon, who had 60 goals, 17 assists and 49 draw controls as a junior.

She was second in draw controls to her best friend Lindsey Marshall, who played lacrosse and rugby with Weedon in their younger days.

“It (rugby) was fun, I would for sure do it again if I had an opportunity,” said Weedon, who made the All-County first team last year along with Marshall.

Bailey was extremely excited about the potential for this year’s senior-laden squad led by Weedon, Wrisk and Marshall.

“There were 10 seniors, but those three are unbelievable lacrosse players,” Bailey said.

Midfielder Weedon proved after two seasons that she could be one of the best on the field.

“She has that presence that you know she is going to do great, but between sophomore and junior year she turned into a leader and not someone who as a coach we looked for her to do things on the field, but her teammates looked for her to be able to do things as well,” Bailey said.

Besides lacrosse, Weedon will pursue other interests at St. Joe’s.

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“I want to become a dentist, probably, eventually, but as of now my major is undecided, health services,” she said. “If all else fails, I want to do something like sports medicine or maybe like coaching college lacrosse, but I guess we will just see how it all plays out.”

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Sanchez is one coach looking forward to see how the future plays out, but will cherish the past memories.

“I had the opportunity to watch her play basketball and lacrosse and my eyes popped out of my skull,” he said. “She is just a very special individual and it’s very, very rare in Baltimore County public schools.”

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