xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement

From the Appalachian Trail to a talk about sports concussions [Cockeysville]

From left,  Josh Levy, Scott Frohme, Sean Hallinan and Graham McGee on the Maryland portion of the Appalachian Trail. Covering 42.5 miles in just three days, they hiked the trail from Pen-Mar Park at the Maryland-Pennsylvania line to Harper's Ferry, W Va.
From left,  Josh Levy, Scott Frohme, Sean Hallinan and Graham McGee on the Maryland portion of the Appalachian Trail. Covering 42.5 miles in just three days, they hiked the trail from Pen-Mar Park at the Maryland-Pennsylvania line to Harper's Ferry, W Va.(Submitted photo)

"It was the hardest physical thing I have ever done, and it was awesome," said Sean Hallinan, of Sherwood Hill, about his experience hiking the Appalachian Trail with friends, Josh Levy, of Springlake, and Graham McGee and Scott Frohme, of Springdale. Covering 42.5 miles in just three days, they hiked the Maryland section of the trail from Pen-Mar Park at the Maryland-Pennsylvania line to Harper's Ferry, W Va. Even though the guys had done training hikes before heading out, they were all surprised by not only the physical demands but how mentally difficult it was. "After we all adjusted our thinking from relaxing camping weekend to grueling endurance event, we were fine," Sean said.

A highlight was The Devil's Racecourse, a seriously rocky, uphill climb where the guys quickly learned the value of trekking poles. Water, stretching, good sturdy boots and lots of Ibuprofen also were essential to making it on the trail. One of the funniest parts of the trip was along the bridge into Harpers Ferry where they met up with three busloads of Asian tourists who started taking the group's picture. They couldn't believe folks who live in Baltimore would drive to Pennsylvania so they could hike to West Virginia.

Advertisement

Congratulations to Sean, Josh, Graham and Scott on conquering the Maryland Appalachian Trail. Good luck when you take on your next Appalachian challenge when you hike to Carlisle, Pa., in the spring.

Concussions have been in the news for a while now: prevention, treatment and, especially, the long-term effects on our children. It prompted the Pot Spring Elementary PTA to hold a lecture on what parents need to know about concussion management. Dr. Andrew Tucker, medical director at MedStar Union Memorial Sports Medicine and Baltimore Ravens consulting physician and with Ravens wide receiver Darren Waller were on hand to discuss concussions from a personal and medical perspective. Dr. Tucker, who served on the NFL Committee on Concussions from 1994-2009, gave a comprehensive look at the causes, symptoms and the treatments for concussions. In particular, he noted the changes, in the past five to seven years, in the treatment of concussions and detailed the process from immediate brain and physical rest to a step-wise progression to activity and rehabilitation.

"Put your pride to the side and let it play out," said Waller, who noted how difficult it is, especially for competitive athletes, to adhere to rest and rehabilitation after a concussion. The rookie wide receiver spoke of his personal experience with the three concussions, one each in high school, college and the NFL, and how important it is to follow medical advice. Particularly interesting was his account of his recovery from his concussion suffered just a month ago as a Raven — his journey beginning with four days in a dark, quiet environment to active rehabilitation with balance and focus training to an Impact Test to check his visual and verbal memory before being cleared for football activity.

Thanks to Marie Depew, nurse practitioner and Pot Spring PTA; Alie Merani, Pikesville High School nurse; and Rebecca Colt-Ferguson, Pot Spring school nurse for organizing the informative event.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement