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Historic house tour Dec. 9 boosts Glyndon community projects

Glyndon Carolers - (from left to right) Nan Kaestner, Marti Clements, Mary Ellen Porter, Sue Benson, Bob Grover, Lauren DeHaven, Gary Lenz, and Charlie Wells.
Glyndon Carolers - (from left to right) Nan Kaestner, Marti Clements, Mary Ellen Porter, Sue Benson, Bob Grover, Lauren DeHaven, Gary Lenz, and Charlie Wells. (Michael O'Neill / Courtesy Historic Glyndon Inc.)

The holidays are coming up fast, and the historic community of Glyndon is doing its part to get in the spirit. On Saturday, Dec. 9, some of the historic houses in the community will be taking part in a self-guided “Glyndon by Candlelight” tour between the hours of 4 p.m. and 8 p.m.

Eight homes are on this year’s tour, which will encompass Central Avenue and Chatsworth Street. The streets will be closed to vehicle traffic to make it a pedestrian-friendly event. The homes featured will be decorated inside and out. Carolers will be making the rounds, and live music also will be featured in some of the homes.

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This is the second time that Historic Glyndon Inc. has organized a holiday home tour. Monies raised from this and other events go to help preserve various projects in the community. Glyndon has had its historic roots in the Baltimore area since the late 1800s, when it began as a place for city folk to relax in the summertime at their cottages and country homes, and it can boast being the first district to be included on the Baltimore County Landmarks list.

“We have earmarked money this year for the restoration of the old train station, now the post office,” said Kathy Ziese, publicity chair for the Historic Glyndon Holiday House Tour. Some of the money raised also will be used to support the Woman’s Club of Glyndon Inc. — housed in a former two-room schoolhouse — which features educational speakers and offers history lessons, among other activities.

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“We try to get a sampling of different styles of homes,” Ziese said of the tour. “Cape Cods, Victorian, arts and crafts.”

Ziese, a teacher for Baltimore County Public Schools, has also been in her Glyndon house for the past 20 years. “I had always wanted to live in this community,” she said.

Merchants are also getting involved in the fundraising event, as are students from The Forbush School, a special needs facility in Glyndon, who will be showcasing their flower-arranging talents in some of the homes.

Sandi Kroh, who owns The Boxwood Collection gift store, is one of the merchants who is participating in this year’s event. Area shops plan on staying open later and their mantra is “Shop Glyndon.” The participating merchants also will be raffling off a dinner party and will be servicing the winner with all the supplies needed for the occasion. “My store will be providing hot soup and hot chocolate,” Kroh said. The other merchants will be offering other goodies as well.

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Ziese said her organization hopes to surpass the $9,000 it raised in 2012 with the first holiday home tour. The 500 tickets for that event sold out, and this year 500 tickets again will be available to buy in advance at local merchants or online at $25 per ticket. This year, 150 additional tickets will be set aside to be sold at the gate for $30 (cash or checks only will be accepted at the gate).

Local homeowners Marianne and Paul Crampton participated in the first house tour five years ago and said even though it was a hectic event, they enjoyed meeting many of the people who came to see their home, which was built in 1893. “My favorite part,” Marianne Crampton said, “was meeting people who had played or lived in our home.”

One woman who remembered the Cramptons’ house had lived there during the Depression, when the building served as a boardinghouse. “She had lived in a rented room on the third floor,” Marianne Crampton said. “It was fascinating to hear these stories.”

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