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Governor's race draws Catonsville voters to polls

Voters said it was the closely contested gubernatorial race, not local county council and county executive's races, that brought them out to the polls in Catonsville Tuesday afternoon.

Sarah Mayhew, 26, a teacher in Howard County who lives in Catonsville, was among the voters who trickled in and out of Hillcrest Elementary School.

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"I'm not as interested in the local issues," Mayhew said. "I'm more interested in statewide races that impact education."

Mayhew, a Democrat, said she voted for Democrat Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown over Republican Larry Hogan because, "I like where he stands on education," adding that she thought it was important to vote and set a good example for her students.

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"I'm a middle school teacher and we've been talking about the civil rights movement...so I feel it's important to vote, especially being a woman," Mayhew said.

Katie Chrzanow, 29, a registered Republican said she, "votes for the person, not the party."

She said she voted for Hogan, but confessed she had not been excited about either candidate.

Still, she believes it is important to vote in the midterm election, she said.

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"I feel like you have an opportunity to make a greater impact at the local level," said Chrzanow, who lives in Catonsville.

Election judges at the Hillcrest Elementary location said turnout was slow and steady through the early afternoon.

"It's been steady, We;ve seen bursts," said chief election judge David McDuffie. "It was busy at 7 a.m. this morning."

By noon, 15 percent of registered voters in Baltimore County had cast a ballot, said county board of elections director Katie Brown.

"It's pretty normal for the time of day," Brown said Tuesday afternoon. "People usually come by after work so we expect it to pick up then."

"We're hoping for a 30 percent turnout by the end of the day," Brown said.

In the 1st Councilmanic District, which includes Catonsville, Arbutus and Lansdowne, voters could choose between Tom Quirk, the Democratic incumbent, and Al Nalley, the Republican challenger.

For the state Senate representative for District 12 that includes the southwestern portion of Baltimore County along with Columbia, Ellicott City and Elkridge in Howard County, voters could choose between Edward Kasemeyer, the Democratic incumbent, and Jesse Pippy, the Republican challnger.

For the House of Delegates, there are six new faces from which to chose.

Democrats Eric Ebersole, Terri Hill and Clarence Lam are vying with Republicans Gordon Bull, Joseph Hooe and Rick Martel to replace longtime state Dels. James Malone, Steven DeBoy and Liz Bobo.

The Republicans, who campaigned at the polling location, expressed confidence in their chances of winning the district where registered Democrats outnumber registered Republicans by more than 2 to 1.

"I'm just getting a lot better vibes from people," said Martel, who ran unsucessfully for the state senate spot for the district in 2006 and 2010. "I'm sensing people are ready for a change.

"It's putting a bounce in my step because I think I may have a new job in January," Martel said.

Voters have until 8 p.m. to cast their vote at a designated polling place.

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