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Among the participants at Lansdowne High School who donned bald caps as a show of support for those fighting cancer were, from left: Front row, Julie Cooper, Monyae Kerney, Kaelyn Fisher and Letitia Harvey and back row, Wendy Happel, Torrie Kerney, Anita Hutchins, Michelle Baylor, Daniel Alburger, Natalie Adams, R. Chris Wilde and Luke Simon.
Among the participants at Lansdowne High School who donned bald caps as a show of support for those fighting cancer were, from left: Front row, Julie Cooper, Monyae Kerney, Kaelyn Fisher and Letitia Harvey and back row, Wendy Happel, Torrie Kerney, Anita Hutchins, Michelle Baylor, Daniel Alburger, Natalie Adams, R. Chris Wilde and Luke Simon. (Submitted photo by Torrie Kerney)

A group of students from Lansdowne High School raised more than $170 over the past month to donate to cancer research at the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

"We wanted to do something that was going to be fun," said Monyae Kerney, a Lansdowne sophomore who organized the effort as part of the school's Our Global Community Organization, which she started earlier in the school year.

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The club's first fundraiser was a sale of bald caps as a show of support for those going through cancer treatment. It was inspired by the leukemia diagnosis of Kerney's friend's sister.

From the beginning of May through May 22, Kerney and other club members sold latex bald caps at the school cafeteria in an effort to raise both funds and awareness.

The caps sold for $5 each and the club sold 32 of them, along with accepting donations.

"We expected to raise $150, but we actually surpassed that," said the 16-year-old, who is already excited about the next project the club will host.

Making the fundraiser even more successful, she added, has been the fact that a mix of faculty, staff and students have gotten involved.

Kerney's mother, Torrie Kerney, is a secretary at the school. She said she is proud of her daughter's work.

"It sheds light on the issue and also tells the children that are going through this ongoing treatment that we care," she said.

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