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Baltimore County officials are looking for man who moved a rabid raccoon in Pikesville

The Baltimore County Health Department is trying to find a man who moved a raccoon out of the road in the unit block of Slade Avenue in Pikesville, the department said Tuesday. The raccoon tested positive for rabies and the man needs to seek immediate medical attention, officials said.

The Baltimore County Police Department on Friday responded to a call for a raccoon that was hit by a car and an officer was dispatched, police spokeswoman Natalie Litofsky said. While the responding officer turned his car around to park on the side of the road where the raccoon was, she said, an unidentified man got out of his car and moved the raccoon.

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The man who moved the raccoon — and who may have been exposed to the rabies virus — is described as white, in his late 30s with brown hair and glasses and driving a Toyota four-door sedan. The man moved quickly and police were unable to get a more accurate description, a photo or a license plate number, Litofsky said.

“The person was trying to do a good thing in getting an animal out of the road, but obviously the health department would advise that you never touch a wild animal in any condition,” Litofsky said.

Anyone with information about the man or anyone who may have come in contact with the rabid animal, is asked to contact the Department of Health at 410-887-5963 Monday through Friday during regular business hours, or 410-832-7182 after normal business hours.

If untreated, rabies is fatal in animals and humans. Humans can be treated with post-exposure prophylaxis to prevent the onset of symptoms and death.

Most people who get rabies do not show symptoms for two to eight weeks after exposure, according to Baltimore County Animal Services officials. If a person who is exposed to rabies becomes symptomatic, it is almost always too late for that person to receive treatment, and care becomes palliative rather than curative.

Because of the way rabies spreads in the body once a person is exposed or possibly exposed, it is recommended that anyone who is even possibly exposed to a rabid animal — be it through a lick, bite or scratch — seek immediate medical attention.

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