An article in the Sept. 11, 1915 edition of The Argus reported that a local resident received the death sentence.

Governor Goldsborough Tuesday signed death warrants for Benjamin E. Davis and Marion Deems, both of whom were convicted of first-degree murder in the Baltimore County Circuit Court. They will be hanged at Towson on October 15.

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Davis killed his wife, Mrs. Mary A. Davis, at St. Denis on January 28. They had had domestic troubles. Deems killed Miss Laura Schaefer, a deaf-mute, near Westport, on June 28. He said his motive was robbery and that he got 53 cents.

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While cutting grass Thursday afternoon in a field in the rear of his home, Christopher Schatz, of Bishop's lane, accidentally cut the leg of his eldest son, Andrew, with a scythe.

The father had gone to the field to mow grass when the child came up back of him. A deep gash was cut in the boy's leg. Dr. Marchall B. West was summoned and it required several stitches to close the wound.

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George Maisel, the star outfielder of the Scranton team of New York State League, who was recently sold to Detroit, is at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Christian Maisel, of Ingleside avenue, awaiting instructions from Hugh Jennings. George is looking the picture of health and is anxious to join the Tigers to prove that Jennings made no mistake when he bought his release from Scranton. All of the sporting writers of Scranton speak in the highest terms of Maisel's ability both at the bat and in the field, and predict for him a brilliant future with the Tigers.

75 Years Ago

An article in the Sept. 13, 1940 edition of the Herald Argus and Baltimore Countian revealed the dangers of contents under pressure.

Betty Lou Gray, age 4, Dorothy M. Gray, 7, and Laumarie Smith, 8, all of Ilchester, were injured in a peculiar accident last Friday. All three youngsters were cut about the face and hands when a jug exploded.

Seated in the back of an automobile operated by Ernest Knabe, also of Ilchester, the children were watching Mr. Knabe fill a five gallon jar with water through a rubber hose fitted in the neck of the container. The pressure caused the jug to burst suddenly, showering fragments of glass on the children.

Patrolmen John Trammel and George F. Neeb of the Catonsville police rendered first aid to the youngsters, then rushed them to St. Agnes' Hospital. Betty Lou suffered the most serious cuts. After treatment at the hospital, they were returned to their homes where they were reported to be recovering.

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Major Louis E. Lamborn, head of McDonogh School, this week admitted that the school is studying plans to bring an entire British boys' school, including students and teachers, to Maryland for the duration of the war. It has been reported that negotiations have been started through Canadian agencies to transfer a school in Northern Scotland or one near London to McDonogh.

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Kenneth Putman of Avondale avenue, driver-salesman of an ice cream truck, reported in Catonsville Police Station that he had been robbed of $36.50 last Sunday night.

Putman told police that he was parked on Old Frederick road near Ingleside avenue, Catonsville, when a man approached from a nearby woodland, pointed a gun at him and demanded his money. Putman says he gave the man $35 in currency and that his assailant then snatched his money changer, which contained about $1.50. The man then disappeared into the woods.

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Wilfred E. Stall of Wilkens avenue, Baltimore, made a $50 mistake on Monday night of this week by turning into a blind alley on Stafford street. At any rate, he was trapped there by Patrolmen Benjamin Croft and James Jones of the Catonsville Police and arrested on a speeding charge. Magistrate John B. Rowe later fined Stall $50 in the Catonsville Police Court.

50 Years Ago

An article in the Sept. 16, 1965 edition of the Herald Argus and Baltimore Countian reports a case of missing milk.

Either someone has heard an inside word that milk prices are on the upward rise, or a new dairy is in the process of being formed. Are you wondering why we are coming to this conclusion?

Eleven homes in the Lansdowne area, all of them on Ryerson Circle, had milk removed from the porches during the past week. Unusually enough, four homes in the Edmondson Heights area, two on Clairidge road, one on Harwall road and one on Bradswell road, had the same type of theft during the past week.

A glass of milk, anyone?

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"Tagged" Catonsville and Woodlawn boys and girls are really "IN" this Fall.

While tag wearing is not the latest teenage craze, it will identify members of the Baltimore County Youth Council (Project M.I.N.C.) who have teamed up to ring residential door bells for the Community Chest-Red Cross United Appeal campaign.

Mrs. Duane C. Wright, president of the Woman's Club of Westview Park, the organization that sponsors the Youth Council, said that the young people had voted almost unanimously to undertake the project. "Helping to raise money for the United Appeal which supports so many worthy causes," said Mrs. Wright, "was just the kind of community project that the Youth Council was looking for."

While membership in the council numbers some 300 boys and girls from 13 to 21 years old, only 40 or 50 of the high school and college age members will participate in the solicitation, which will encompass nearly 700 homes in the Westview Park area.

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On Sunday, Sept. 12, police were notified that two boys were seen on the roof of the Johnnycake elementary school, entering through the trap door on the roof. Upon arrival of Officer William H. Rauach, Jr., the two boys were seen throwing something to the ground, later found to be school supplies, amounting in the value to $37. The two boys then jumped to the ground and were apprehended. The youths, one 14 years of age and the other 16, told police that they had seen two other youths on the roof. When they came near, the youths ran. They said they had climbed to the roof to investigate. They were taken to the Wilkens Police Station and later released to the custody of their parents pending further investigation.

Material from archives courtesy of the Catonsville Historical Society.

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