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‘Full of life’: Family and friends remember 32-year-old Shaunya Green, fatally shot in White Marsh, as fearless, fun-loving

Before her death, Shaunya Green crossed countless items off her bucket list — bungee jumping, zip-lining and traveling to Africa to walk among elephants — to name a few, her family said.

The 32-year-old mother of two, remembered as a caring nurse with a love for adventure, was shot and killed by her ex-boyfriend Thursday after a dispute in her White Marsh home, police say.

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Gomezgeka L. Chisala, 29, confessed to her killing, police say, and has been charged with first-degree murder. He has been ordered held without bail while he awaits a preliminary hearing in August. Neither he nor his lawyer could be reached for comment by The Baltimore Sun.

Green was born March 19, 1989 in Erie, Pennsylvania, her family said. A 2007 graduate of Northwestern Pennsylvania Collegiate Academy, she studied nursing at Coppin State University in Baltimore. Green started her career at Johns Hopkins Hospital, and was working at St. Joseph Medical Center and Total Health Care at the time of her death, her family said. She is survived by her two children, both from previous relationships, A’Ryanna and Jordan Green.

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Shaunya Green, 32, (seen with her son Jordan Green) was shot and killed in her White Marsh home on Thursday.
Shaunya Green, 32, (seen with her son Jordan Green) was shot and killed in her White Marsh home on Thursday. (handout)

Green’s family described her as the life of the party, who cherished “Wine Wednesday” with her co-workers, but could turn just about anything into a celebration.

“She was just crazy, full of life,” said her sister, Kiara Green. “You could just be sitting there at a party, bored, and she’ll come along, make it fun and turn it up.”

Her grandfather, Thómas Green, said he’ll always remember how his granddaughter would say hello when they spent time together.

“She’d always greet me with a big, beautiful smile, say ‘Hi, Grandpa,’ and give me a kiss on my cheek,” he said.

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Her cousin, Nachelle Lunger, said she last saw Green at her brother’s wedding in Erie in June. Hours before the wedding was set to begin, Lunger realized she hadn’t bought a pair of shoes, so she went to the mall with Green, an avid shopper. But Green split off, and started shopping on her own. By the time her family found her, checking out at JCPenney, the group was too late to get their manicures for the wedding, and had to rush to the ceremony, Lunger said.

“That girl was a fashionista at its finest,” Lunger said. “She would shop all day if you let her.”

After arriving at the wedding, a baby in the crowd, who was breathing through a tracheostomy tube, started having difficulty breathing. Green jumped into action, helping the baby’s mother unclog the tube, Lunger said.

“She had this big sun hat on. She took it off and flung it across the yard, and just started jumping into nurse mode,” Lunger said with a laugh.

Nachelle Lunger and her cousin Shaunya Green, who was killed Thursday in her White Marsh home.
Nachelle Lunger and her cousin Shaunya Green, who was killed Thursday in her White Marsh home.

Later that night, things soured, Lunger said, when Green and Chisala got into a physical fight, and Chisala drove off. Worried for her safety, Lunger and others tried to convince Green not to return home to White Marsh. But she insisted she could handle it.

Lunger said she grew up alongside Green, and so the two called each other “sissy cousin.” Lunger’s children often mistakenly called Green their aunt, she said.

Green was a “daredevil” from an early age, Lunger said. She would pick fights with Lunger’s brothers when they beat her high score in Nintendo’s Duck Hunt. As she got older, her adventurous spirit soared to even greater heights, as she tried bungee jumping abroad. Afterward, she called Lunger in a burst of excitement, insisting that she try it one day, too.

“It was just no fear with her,” Lunger said. “She didn’t care. She just lived life.”

In 2019, Lunger and her family, who live just outside of Houston, Texas, visited Green in Baltimore. The families were especially close. As they parted, Lunger and Green started to cry, realizing they wouldn’t see each other for several months.

“We look up, and our daughters are sitting there doing the same thing,” she said.

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