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Former Baltimore Police Internal Affairs Division Chief Rodney Hill is the new police legal advisor for the Baltimore County Police Department. (Karl Merton Ferron / Baltimore Sun Staff)
Former Baltimore Police Internal Affairs Division Chief Rodney Hill is the new police legal advisor for the Baltimore County Police Department. (Karl Merton Ferron / Baltimore Sun Staff) (Karl Merton Ferron / Baltimore Sun)

The Baltimore County Police Department has hired a former Baltimore Police commander who supervised internal affairs and other investigations within the city’s police department.

Rodney Hill was recently hired as Baltimore County’s police legal adviser, according to county spokesman Sean Naron Tuesday. Hill was previously the Baltimore Police Internal Affairs Division Chief until he retired in March 2018.

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Hill will receive a salary of $125,000, Naron said. He will perform legal and administrative work, such as providing advice on employment, civil and criminal matters. Hill’s duties also include preparing contracts, pleadings, search warrants and other legal documents. He will also train law enforcement personnel and review department policies and code enforcement.

Hill, a Baltimore native, joined the Baltimore Police Department in 2013, from the city law department. He is a former Baltimore County assistant state’s attorney and a retired deputy district commander with the Montgomery County police department, where he served for 20 years.

Hill was previously responsible for reviewing and overseeing internal investigations into Baltimore police misconduct while the department faced intense scrutiny of the department. That included the death of Freddie Gray from injuries suffered in police custody in 2015, the subsequent Justice Department investigation and report on widespread unconstitutional practices within the department in 2016, and the federal indictments of the agency’s corrupt Gun Trace Task Force in 2017.

Hill was part of a police task force investigating Gray’s death when Baltimore prosecutors charged six officers involved in Gray’s arrest. None of the officers were convicted, and the department outsourced its internal investigations into Gray’s death to investigators in Montgomery and Howard counties.

The city police department said last year that Hill’s retirement was “voluntary,” and the department said his departure didn’t have anything to do with his performance.

Baltimore Sun reporter Kevin Rector contributed to this article.

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