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Baltimore County Council delays discussion of measure seeking privacy provisions for police body cameras

The Baltimore County Council is delaying its discussion of a measure that would call for rules governing who can watch video footage from police body cameras.

The council was scheduled to hold a public hearing on the resolution Tuesday afternoon, but is postponing the discussion for two weeks because State's Attorney Scott Shellenberger was not available, officials said.

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Shellenberger is supporting a council resolution that would urge the Maryland General Assembly to consider statewide legislation to "carefully regulate" when the public can view the footage "without trampling upon the overarching goal of transparency in police/community relations."

Two Baltimore County councilmen want state lawmakers to take a second look at body camera regulations, saying they're concerned about invasion of privacy.

The resolution is sponsored by Councilman Todd Crandell of Dundalk and Councilman Wade Kach of Cockeysville, both Republicans. Crandell said he wants to protect the privacy of victims and bystanders who could be caught on camera by the police body cameras.

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Shellenberger, a Democrat, planned to testify in favor of the resolution.

The American Civil Liberties Union, meanwhile, has said there already are sufficient privacy protections in the state's body camera laws.

More than 1,400 Baltimore County police officers are outfitted with body cameras.

Baltimore County Police have completed training about 1,400 officers and equipped them with body-worn cameras, officials announced Tuesday.
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