Advertisement

Former Daughters of the Confederacy leader on Baltimore monument removal: 'Rats run at night'

Carolyn  Billups, former president of the Maryland chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy and author of a book about Louise Wigfall Wright, talks about her feelings about the Confederate monuments in Baltimore being taken down especially the Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument. (Kenneth K. Lam, Baltimore Sun video)

Carolyn Billups, former president of the Maryland chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, said she had considered chaining herself to the Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument in Bolton Hill.

Now, she won't get the chance to take her stand.

Advertisement

Crews hauled off the 114-year-old Baltimore monument during the night – a sneaky move, Billups said.

"Rats run at night," she said. "It's very saddening, but at least the monuments were not torn down by angry mobs."

The 65-year-old retired radiographer said her great-great-grandfather, Joseph Hardin Massie, fought in the 13th Virginia Infantry during the Civil War. Billups wrote a book in the late 1990s about Louise Wigfall Wright, the woman who founded the Maryland chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. Wright led fundraising to erect the Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument.

Billups wondered what's next for the Baltimore monuments.

"I want to know where they went," she said. "What's going to happen to them?"

Advertisement
Advertisement