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No injuries reported after 21 Philadelphia-bound freight cars derail in Baltimore City

A 21-car freight train derailment near Sisson and West 24th streets in North Baltimore was cleared from the tracks about 5 a.m. Tuesday, and train service resumed within the hour, according to CSX Transportation, the railroad company.

The derailment happened as the 109-car train was passing through Baltimore about 6:30 p.m. Monday on its way to Philadelphia from Avon, Indiana, a company official said.

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No hazardous materials were involved, and there were no injuries to the train crew or the public, according to Cindy Schild, director of media relations and public affairs for the Jacksonville, Florida-based railroad.

The derailed cars were either empty or carrying pulpwood or sand, said Schild, who added that CSX is working closely with and appreciates the quick response by Baltimore fire and police departments as well as the Maryland Department of Transportation.

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“The safety of the community and everyone on site is our top priority as we develop a recovery plan,” Schild said.

Another CSX freight train derailed nearby in 2019. It was traveling north on elevated tracks near the North Avenue bridge when several cars derailed, plunging onto Falls Road. No one was injured, but one person’s vehicle was nearly struck by a toppled light pole.

At times Monday night, small groups of bystanders peered over the railings on the Sisson Street bridge to the tilted train cars below. From there, the train cars stretched out of sight into the darkness.

Jeff Waskiewicz and his 9-year-old daughter, Lilly, headed to the city from Catonsville to see the derailment’s aftermath.

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“I saw it on my Facebook news, and I was like, ‘Oh, let’s go check this out,’” Jeff Waskiewicz said.

“Daddy’s just curious,” his daughter said with a smile, her flashlight in hand.

The cause of the derailment is under investigation, Schild said.

The rail cars still laid on their sides on the inside of the track’s curve Tuesday as crews investigated what happened and prepared to clean up and repair the site.

Baltimore Sun reporter Colin Campbell contributed to this article.

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