With thousands of protesting students in the background, Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh appeared on MSNBC during the March For Our Lives rally in Washington to call on Congress to listen to the voices of young people.

Pugh sat on what reporter Joy Reid called her “all-star mayoral panel” Saturday, alongside D.C. Mayor Muriel Bower and Mayor Teresa Tomlinson of Columbus, Ga.

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“This is a wake-up call for the country,” Pugh said during the segment. “The NRA has ruled too long in our country.”

Baltimore provided transportation to the march for some 3,000 city students, who also received T-shirts and lunch. Private donations funded the entire trip, Pugh said.

Baltimore's Excel students, no strangers to gun violence, make their voices heard at March For Our Lives

Students from Excel Academy in Baltimore, which has lost seven students to gun violence since last year, went to the March for Our Lives anti-gun violence rally in Washington on Saturday to tell U.S. policymakers that “enough is enough.”

Pugh told the panel that it’s important for the voices of urban children, who are regularly impacted by gun violence, to be heard.

“This kind of violence has to stop,” she said. “Perhaps Congress will listen to the voices of our young people today when they’re calling for better background checks and to get these assault weapons off the streets of our city.”

Her fellow panelists, both Democrats, echoed her sentiments during the six-minute segment, which is available online here.

The conversation stood in stark contrast to Pugh’s recent appearance on Fox News host Laura Ingraham’s show, during which the two ideologically opposed women got into it on-air.

Baltimore Mayor Pugh gets into on-air spat with Laura Ingraham — and it wasn't pretty

I would like to be a hometown booster and say Pugh really gave it to one of the nastier right-wing commentators on American TV. But the truth is the mayor desperately needs better media advice. It was not a good look for the mayor or Baltimore.

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