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50 gather in Federal Hill to support police

A vigil is held at Federal Hill Park for the fallen Dallas officers. (Amy Davis, Baltimore Sun video)

"We stand with you Dallas," said the homemade sign Teri George held against her chest.

The Northeast Baltimore mother said she worries about her 25-year-old son, a Baltimore City police officer.

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"It's hard as a mom for your kids to go and suit up every day," she said. Amid last year's riots, "My son had a brick thrown through his car window. He actually had some glass go in his eye. It's not right. You don't hear about all the officers who get hurt. Nobody sticks up for them."

George and about 50 people gathered at Federal Hill Park Sunday for a candlelight vigil. They wore blue T-shirts and cupped their hands around tall, white candles, flickering in the evening breeze.

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"There should be a lot more people," said George's fiancee, Scott Blasi. His sign said, "I support my nation's law enforcement."

Then they fell silent as Oliver Groman, who came from Pennsylvania, read the names of those Dallas officers killed.

"Know that not every single person may not have your back, but the majority of us do," said Joseph Mummert, of Glen Burnie. "We're always here for you guys."

Karen Walker, a 37-year-old homemaker from Glen Burnie, founded the Facebook group Stand Up For Baltimore City Police after last year's riots following the death of Freddie Gray, who suffered fatal spinal injuries in the back of a police transport van. She organized the vigil on Sunday.

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"It's about remembering five officers," she said. "There are kids whose fathers aren't coming home and wives whose husbands aren't coming home."

"I'm not saying all cops are good," she said, but "95 percent are good officers out there doing their jobs protecting people they don't even know." Walker said she disagrees with "the way the cops are being abused and treated" by protesters in Baton Rouge and Minnesota.

An earlier version misrepresented Karen Walker's views on Baton Rouge and Minnesota. The Sun regrets the error.

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