xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

City jury awards $1.4 million in lead paint case

A 23-year-old woman who claimed she suffered permanent brain damage and learning difficulties from exposure to flaking lead paint in a rented Northwest Baltimore home has been awarded $1.4 million by a city jury.

The judgment, rendered Monday, is the second time Starlena Stevenson has been awarded damages in the case she brought against S&S Partnership, Stanley Rochkind and Deer Management and Construction Co. A different jury awarded her nearly $1.4 million following a trial in March, but Judge Stephen J. Sfekas declared that excessive and ordered a new trial on damages.

Advertisement

Judge Pamela J. White presided over the 10-day retrial. Stevenson's lawyers presented evidence that lead concentrations measured in her blood in the early 1990s were more than twice the level later set by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as a threshold for taking public health action to protect youngsters from exposure.

Because Maryland law caps noneconomic damage awards, Stevenson stands to receive $1.1 million from the second jury verdict if it's upheld, according to Robert Leonard, one of her lawyers.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Bruce Spern, lawyer for S&S Partnership, declined to comment. Lawyers for Rochkind could not be reached.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement