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Former Baltimore police commissioner Kevin Davis appointed as Fairfax County police chief

Baltimore Police Commissioner Kevin Davis told a group of city law enforcement leaders on Wednesday that he wants a federal monitor for the police department to have big-city police experience.
Baltimore Police Commissioner Kevin Davis told a group of city law enforcement leaders on Wednesday that he wants a federal monitor for the police department to have big-city police experience. (Karl Merton Ferron / Baltimore Sun)

Three years after he was ousted as Baltimore police commissioner, Kevin Davis has been appointed chief of police for the police department in Fairfax County, Virginia.

Fairfax County Board of Supervisors approved Davis’ appointment Friday. He will start May 3 and earn a salary of $215,000.

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Mayor Catherine Pugh fired Davis as head of Baltimore police in January 2018, saying at the time she had grown “impatient” with his failure to tamp down on surging city crime. He had been two years into a five-year term.

Davis led the department when it came under a federal civil rights investigation, and helped negotiate and begin implementing police reforms under the city’s consent decree with the Justice Department.

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Before that, Davis served as a the Anne Arundel County police chief and was a high-ranking commander in the Prince George’s County Police Department as that agency implemented a consent decree.

Most recently he has worked as director of consulting services for GardaWorld, a Montreal-based private security firm, according to a Fairfax County news release.

Calling into an in-person meeting of the Fairfax supervisors’ board, Davis said he was humbled to join a police department that “enjoys a stellar reputation.”

Police “have to be better listeners” and “be less defensive” when it comes to listening to communities, and especially people of color, Davis said.

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His first step will be to “establish legitimacy to earn trust,” he said. “That takes hard work.”

Davis will replace former Fairfax police chief Edwin Roessler, who retired in February.

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