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Chaplain who runs outreach center out of floral shop recovering from being hit by vehicle at Mondawmin Mall

The man who survived after being struck by a vehicle outside Mondawmin Mall earlier this month was released from the hospital last week with extensive injuries to his head, neck and back that he said have left him unable to return to his floral shop and outreach center in the Mondawmin neighborhood.

The Rev. Keith Bailey, a chaplain for the Baltimore Police Department and president of the Fulton Heights Community Organization, was at the mall the afternoon of March 1 handing off flowers to a client celebrating a retirement party.

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The last thing he remembers is hugging her before turning to enter the Shoppers Food Market, where he was struck on the sidewalk, he said.

Then, nothing, until he woke up in the hospital without his shoes.

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“They told me I went up in the air,” Bailey said. “I couldn’t even talk when I got home; my speech was gone.”

Bailey was one of two men hit by a vehicle in front of the Shoppers Food Market around 3:25 p.m. March 1. The other, Garrick Williams Jr., a community-cherished coach for FCA Baltimore Park Heights Secret Society Saints, was pronounced dead at the scene.

Police said at the time of the crash it was unclear whether the driver, who was stopped at the scene, was under the influence or suffered a medical emergency. Baltimore City Police Department spokesperson Detective Chakia Fennoy wrote in an email Saturday that no one has been arrested or charged in the crash.

“I’m still here,” Bailey said. “And this man. … I was so hurt” to learn of his death, he said of Williams.

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Bailey, who works with area youths, provides meals and clothes to homeless people, and operates a counseling center to help people find work, has been a vocal leader against violence in Baltimore.

Freddie Gray, whose death from injuries suffered in police custody ignited protests across the city in 2015, performed more than 100 hours of court-ordered community service under Bailey’s supervision with the Fulton Heights Community Organization.

Bailey has always strove to give back to his community, he said. After the crash, his community is giving back to him by bringing food and checking on him at his home, he said.

“I have never ... tears come to my eyes, just to see my people, that would reach out to me when they heard they happened to me,” Bailey said.

“I’m trying to slowly gain each day to try to get my life back together.”

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