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Baltimore reacts to news that Freddie Gray trials will remain in city

A Baltimore Circuit Court judge ruled Thursday that the trials of six officers charged in the arrest and death of Freddie Gray would be held in Baltimore.

Here's a snapshot of the reaction from those gathered outside the courthouse and others around the city:

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Sharon Black

As people began to see on Twitter that the trial would not be moved, shouts erupted in the crowd.

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"We're elated," said Sharon Black of the Peoples Power Assembly said after. She described how the crowd around her were clapping, crying and shouting in joy.

The decision "lifted spirits," she said, describing systemic issues throughout the city that have contributed to many residents feeling overlooked and ignored, not just on issues of police brutality but other problems, from vacant houses to the lack of jobs.

The judge's decision however, she said is merely "a battle in the war."

Billy Murphy

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"It was a wise decision, totally supported by existing law," said Murphy, the attorney for Gray's family.

"It is rare that a jurisdiction should be deprived of handling it's own criminal business," he said.

He added, "it was a brave decision."

But Murphy said he doesn't believe judge Williams was impacted by public pressure.

Adam Jackson

Adam Jackson, who sat in on the hearing, said the judge agreed that in this day and age, technology has diminished the argument out of the city, saying national and international media have reported facts of the case.

"It's impossible in the 21st century age," Jackson said.

Jackson said he felt that the defense was shopping for a more favorable jury pool.

"You're looking for a particular type of jury pool," he said, in counties surrounding the city, which are less diverse and more conservative than Baltimore, he said.

Malik Trusty

Malik Trusty, 47, who said he is a friend of the Gray family, said the trials didn't need to occur outside the city.

"Somewhere else they probably would have got off scot-free," he said if the trials had been moved.

Julie MacGregor

"I think it's terrific," said Julie MacGregor, who has protested outside both hearings.

"If the trials are held to the letter of the law, we might have convictions," she said.

"It's a huge relief," she said. "It's a jury of your peers. They should be tried here."

She added, "clearly history shows that when people stop voicing their opinions then the charges get dropped."

Eliza Cade

Some at the protest said they thought the city would see rioting again if the trials were moved outside of Baltimore.

"It would cause a problem because us as people right now, we feel like we have no voice," said Eliza Cade, 25, of Baltimore. "I think that it would cause something of that nature to happen again."

Tony Thornton

Tony Thornton, who observed the protest but didn't take part, said the anger he heard from protesters led him to believe they would "tear this city down," if the trials were moved.

"I think for these people that's everything," said Thornton, 50, of Baltimore. "If they move them out of the city, this city is going to be torn down."

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