xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Baltimore firefighters revive dog with pet oxygen mask after pulling it from burning home

Firefighters rescued a dog from a burning house in Westport Monday night.
Firefighters rescued a dog from a burning house in Westport Monday night. (Courtesy of the Baltimore City Fire Department)

Firefighters revived a dog after pulling it from a burning house Monday night in Westport, according to the Baltimore City Fire Department.

Fire crews responded to a blaze in the 2200 block of Sidney Ave. at about 9 p.m. Monday, fire department spokeswoman Blair Adams said.

Advertisement

When firefighters arrived on the scene, flames were visible on the second floor of a house in the middle of the block.

A man in the house escaped on his own and was taken to a hospital in serious condition due to smoke inhalation, Adams said.

Advertisement
Firefighters put a pet oxygen mask on a dog after it was pulled from a house fire in Westport Monday night.
Firefighters put a pet oxygen mask on a dog after it was pulled from a house fire in Westport Monday night. (Courtesy of the Baltimore City Fire Department)

But the man wasn’t the home’s only occupant.

During a search of the home, firefighters found a small mutt in a middle room on the second floor. The dog was unresponsive when they carried it from the home.

After extinguishing the fire, firefighters treated the dog using a pet oxygen mask, provided through a partnership with Invisible Fence Brand. The company has supplied the city fire department with about a dozen masks sized for dogs and cats, Adams said.

Invisible Fence Brand of Maryland donated 28 pet oxygen mask kits — which include a small, medium and large mask, an instructional DVD and a one-page written explanation on how to use them — to the county.

The dog wasn’t breathing well at first, she said, but it came around after about 15 minutes. Later, Animal Control retrieved the dog from the scene. Dogs picked up by Animal Control are taken to the Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter.

“Hopefully there’s positive outcome,” she said.

The fire department does not track how often it uses pet oxygen masks, Adams said.

“We do it more often than not,” she said. “You never know if there’s going to be an animal or not.”

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement