Advertisement
Baltimore City

Morning blaze damages five homes, including vacant units, in Brooklyn; no injuries reported

Baltimore City firefighters spent hours Tuesday morning battling a three-alarm fire that impacted five rowhomes in the Brooklyn neighborhood.

The fire started about 4:30 a.m. in the 3600 block of South Hanover Street, according to the Baltimore City Fire Department. A total of five rowhomes were on fire, of which four were vacant. Residents of the occupied unit weren’t home at the time of the fire, said Blair Adams, city fire department spokesperson.

Advertisement

One building was destroyed and another sustained a partial collapse, the department said. The fire was extinguished before 10 a.m. Tuesday. There were no injuries reported.

Onlookers at the scene Tuesday afternoon stood on sidewalks, lamenting to each other about how vacant properties pose fire hazards. They also noted that sometimes there are occupants within vacant homes.

Advertisement

Neighbors also watched as Baltimore Gas & Electric employees worked to restore power. The fire had damaged some power lines and poles.

A worker said the area could be closed for most of the day while workers repair at least three damaged power line poles. Officials had fenced off the ruble that remained in the aftermath of the fire.

Breaking News Alerts

Breaking News Alerts

As it happens

Be informed of breaking news as it happens and notified about other don't-miss content with our free news alerts.

Baltimore’s vacant housing has been an issue for the city and a growing frustration for people who own or have to live near them.

Last month, a fire ripped through a vacant home in Carrollton Ridge in Southwest Baltimore. There, Baltimore Police found a dead body inside that had been shot. The owner of the home had warned the city months ago there could be a fire.

Mayor Brandon Scott in March announced plans to spend $100 million of the city’s $641 million American Rescue Plan funds on a housing initiative, which includes a strategy to address vacant housing.

It was the deaths of three Baltimore firefighters in a South Stricker Street vacant building fire Jan. 25 that renewed attention on the city’s vacant house issue.

Advertisement

Previous mayors had plans to reduce the number of vacant properties, with new buildings abandoned as fast as the old ones were dealt with.


Advertisement