xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

More irregularities found in Baltimore's election as review continues

Linda H. Lamone, Maryland's elections administrator, has said a number of votes went through that should not have been counted in Baltimore. "There will be precincts that cannot be explained," Lamone said. "We don't know what happened. The numbers simply don't match." (Luke Broadwater/Baltimore Sun video)

State elections officials said Friday that they continue to find irregularities in Baltimore's primary election as they complete their review.

Officials reported Thursday that about 1,000 more votes were cast during the April 26 primary in Baltimore than there were voters checked in at the polls. More than 450 provisional ballots were not considered by election judges. And nearly 800 provisional ballots — given to voters whose eligibility was in question — were improperly counted before eligibility was verified, officials said.

Advertisement

Nikki Baines Charlson, deputy administrator at the State Board of Elections, said Friday that those numbers are increasing. She said she planned to crunch data over the weekend and release new numbers early next week.

All documents in the possession of the city's elections warehouse have now been analyzed, she said, and she is reviewing that data.

Advertisement
Advertisement

"The reconciliation was finished" Thursday," Charlson said. "We are compiling last-minute data. I'll be working through the weekend on that."

Once the state has final numbers, city officials will schedule a time to count the outstanding provisional ballots and recertify the election.

State officials ordered Baltimore's election results decertified last week amid concerns about voting irregularities. For several days, election workers from across the region have conducted a precinct-level review of the city's primary.

The warehouse in West Baltimore where the review had been taking place was closed to the public Friday.

Advertisement

The Rev. Cortly "C.D." Witherspoon, an activist with the group Voters Organized for the Integrity of City Elections, or VOICE, said he was turned away when he tried to enter the warehouse. "We went there, they told us the review is over," he said.

Baltimore's primary election produced several close races. State Sen. Catherine E. Pugh edged former Mayor Sheila Dixon by fewer than 2,500 votes in the Democratic primary for mayor, and some City Council races were decided by a few hundred votes.

twitter.com/lukebroadwater

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement