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Baltimore Museum of Industry was selling medallions cut from iconic Domino Sugars sign. They sold out overnight.

Going, going and gone — the last keepsake medallions from the letter “D” cut from the old, iconic Domino Sugars sign were sold by the Baltimore Museum of Industry on Tuesday morning.

The museum was selling the medallions from the old neon red sign that hung against the city’s skyline for 70 years.

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The medallions had been on sale for about two months and Museum of Industry spokeswoman Claire Mullins said as of Monday morning about 175 — or half the original number of medallions — remained. But by the afternoon, the museum saw an uptick in sales that continued throughout the evening.

The last medallion was sold Tuesday morning, Mullins said.

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Mullins said the museum is starting a waitlist in case they are able to get more medallions but was quick to add, “we can’t make promises on quantity or date of availability.”

Each medallion is priced at $125 and it comes in a clear, plastic protective case in a foam-lined box and is about 32 millimeters in diameter — or slightly larger than a half dollar. A certificate of authenticity comes with the medallion.

The Baltimore Museum of Industry has about 175 medallions from the iconic "D" in the old Domino Sugars sign left for sale. Each medallion costs $125, and there is a limit of two per customer. Photo courtesy of Baltimore Museum of Industry.
The Baltimore Museum of Industry has about 175 medallions from the iconic "D" in the old Domino Sugars sign left for sale. Each medallion costs $125, and there is a limit of two per customer. Photo courtesy of Baltimore Museum of Industry. (Baltimore Museum of Industry)

The original 120-by-70-foot sign was retired March 1 and a new LED-powered replica started casting its brighter red light in the city on the Fourth of July.

The “D” in the sign was most affected by the rust, making it unsalvageable. The sugar packaging plant made 500 medallions for its employees, then donated 355 pieces to the museum to help support its mission.

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In addition to the medallions, the museum received the 5-foot-tall dot on the former “i.”

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