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Baltimore City Council Vice President Edward Reisinger (left) is being challenged in this year's election.  Republican Christine Digman, Democrat Charlie Metz, Republican Michael W. Nolet and Democrat Erica S. White are seeking the District 10 seat.
Baltimore City Council Vice President Edward Reisinger (left) is being challenged in this year's election.  Republican Christine Digman, Democrat Charlie Metz, Republican Michael W. Nolet and Democrat Erica S. White are seeking the District 10 seat. (Handouts)

Three Democrats are challenging Baltimore City Council Vice President Edward Reisinger in the district that stretches from Carroll Park to Cherry Hill and Curtis Bay.

Reisinger, a member of the council for more than 20 years, will face Wanda K. Grimes, businessman Charlie Metz and lawyer Erica S. White in the primary April 26.

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Christine Digman, who works in security, and Michael W. Nolet, a psychologist, will compete in the Republican primary.

Ben Hyman, director of Pigtown Main Street, says the neighborhood — blocks from Camden Yards and M&T Bank Stadium — needs strong representation to reach its full potential.

"Pigtown is a neighborhood with great promise, and we're beginning to realize that promise," Hyman said. Reisinger "has been a great ally for us."

In Westport, which sits just south of Interstate 95, community association president Keisha Allen said the next council member must be prepared to address the redevelopment of nearby Port Covington, the continuing need for road repairs and quality-of-life issues.

"Our district is going through huge changes that will impact our mere existence," Allen said. "We need a leader who is knowledgeable, who has current working relationships with all of the neighborhoods, and who can take our collective neighborhoods forward."

Reisinger, 66, of Morrell Park said he has helped deploy city resources to give children opportunities such as access to after-school programs and a new recreation center, and to address problems including potholes and illegal dumping.

He said he helped put pressure on CSX Corp. to re-evaluate plans to build a rail yard in Morrell Park that would have sent an estimated 150 tractor-trailers through the community each day.

"I am a doer; I get results," said Reisinger, a former lab manager for an eyeglass manufacturer and bar owner.

With more than $80,000 in his campaign account, Reisinger has significantly more money than the other candidates. Metz is the only other candidate to report raising money, with about $2,200, according to filings with the state.

Metz, 58, is also a Morrell Park resident; he owns a small manufacturing and retail company. He said the first thing he would do if elected is file legislation to raise the minimum wage. He said he can improve city management and make residents feel safer.

"I know how to cut through the b.s. and how to get things done," Metz said. "I know how to spend money, and I know how to save money."

White, 43, of Cherry Hill said her education in political science, law and international studies will help her advocate for the district. Chief concerns, she said, include a lack of grocery stores, the need for "breathable air" and Sagamore Development's plan for Port Covington.

"I could contribute my knowledge and my experience to improve the area I live in," White said. "There needs to be real positive, beneficial change to the community."

Grimes did not participate in an interview for this article.

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Digman, 52, of Curtis Bay said the city needs leaders with conservative values to steer Baltimore away from "50 years of failed Democratic rule." She said she is worried that city property taxes — which are twice as high as surrounding counties — can hurt small businesses and stunt neighborhood revitalization.

She says she knows "right from wrong," is frustrated to see "trash cans on every corner" in some neighborhoods and not others, and wants to make sure environmental and educational problems are addressed.

Nolet, 51, of Morrell Park said he is worried about the disenfranchised people in the district. He said he wants to strengthen community bonds. He said he can help the city do a better job evaluating how money is spent.

He said he also wants to help city residents do more to contribute.

"We have lost our center," he said. "I am a person who believes in working to bring people together and build coalitions."

The winners of the Democratic and Republican primaries will face Green Party candidate Amanda Maminski in November.

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