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Baltimore’s CFG Bank donates $2 million for health care training program

Baltimore-based CFG Bank announced Thursday that it will donate $2 million toward a training program for health care workers.

Half the money will launch the Jack and Nancy Dwyer Workforce Development Program, a nonprofit that will provide nursing training to unemployed and underemployed people looking to start careers in health care, according to a news release. The funds will be used to prepare curriculum for the program, hire staff and create future programming and scholarships.

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The other half of CFG’s donation will go toward the construction of a new building run by Living Classrooms, a Baltimore nonprofit that hosts education and workforce development programs. The Bauer Building, which is scheduled to open in July, will host the new health care training, the news release said.

“With our strong presence in the health care market, we see the high turnover of nursing professionals as well as the challenges they face in advancing their career,” said Jack Dwyer, owner and chairman of the board of CFG Bank, in a statement. “We are committed to giving back by creating this unique program that will inspire our health care workers to reach their goals and help resolve the effects of systemic poverty and inequality.”

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CFG, which started in the Highlandtown area in 1972 as La Corona Building and Loan Association Inc., provides banking services for businesses and health care institutions.

Its new nonprofit will offer certified nursing assistant (CNA) and geriatric nursing assistant (GNA) training, and help place participants in jobs at health care facilities, assisted living facilities and nursing homes. Then, students will be offered scholarships to attend nursing school and become registered nurses, according to the release from CFG.

The training will “build on Living Classrooms’ three decades of workforce development programming in Baltimore and utilize a strong case management support system for each trainee,” the release said.

Living Classrooms has already received $1.5 million from the Charles T. Bauer Foundation and $500,000 from the state for its new building.

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“Through this new Living Classrooms facility and partnership, we look forward to supporting the success and economic mobility of each participant with our strong career coaching and case management system built through decades of workforce development experience,” said James Bond, president and CEO of the Living Classrooms Foundation, in a statement.

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