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What's in a name: Baltimore streets

The Abell family represented the early founders of The Baltimore Sun. Today, the name remains as a thoroughfare in Charles VIllage — home to this set of "Painted Ladies."
(Sarah Pastrana / Baltimore Sun Media Group)

What's in a name: Baltimore streets

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Part of a series looking at the history of names of places and things in Maryland. A look at the story behind street names in Baltimore. The Sun published a book on Baltimore street names. Find it here. See more: The names of our counties, bridges, waterways and more.
(Sean Welsh)
What's in a name: Abell Avenue
The Abell family represented the early founders of The Baltimore Sun. Today, the name remains as a thoroughfare in Charles VIllage — home to this set of "Painted Ladies."
The Abell family represented the early founders of The Baltimore Sun. Today, the name remains as a thoroughfare in Charles VIllage — home to this set of "Painted Ladies." (Sarah Pastrana / Baltimore Sun Media Group)
What's in a name: Aliceanna Street
Aliceanna Street is likely named for Aliceanna Webster Bond — the wife of John Bond, one of the first settlers of the Fells Point area. Aliceanna Street intersects with Bond Street -- named for John Bond.
Aliceanna Street is likely named for Aliceanna Webster Bond — the wife of John Bond, one of the first settlers of the Fells Point area. Aliceanna Street intersects with Bond Street -- named for John Bond. (PERRY THORSVIK / Baltimore Sun)
What's in a name: Aisquith Street
Aisquith Street may have been named for the British Lord Asquith, but most believe it was named for Capt. Edward "Ned" Aisquith, a local militiaman who led sharpshooters during the Battle of North Point.
Aisquith Street may have been named for the British Lord Asquith, but most believe it was named for Capt. Edward "Ned" Aisquith, a local militiaman who led sharpshooters during the Battle of North Point. (Kim Hairston / Baltimore Sun)
What's in a name: Auchentoroly Terrace
William Morris Orem owned a large Baltimore estate called Auchentoroly, located just south of Druid Hill Park. He broke up the estate for development, and many city streets — including Bryant, Ruskin and Whittier avenues — were named by Orem after his favorite poets. Auchentoroly Terrace took the name of the former estate.
William Morris Orem owned a large Baltimore estate called Auchentoroly, located just south of Druid Hill Park. He broke up the estate for development, and many city streets — including Bryant, Ruskin and Whittier avenues — were named by Orem after his favorite poets. Auchentoroly Terrace took the name of the former estate. (Algerina Perna / Baltimore Sun)
What's in a name: Barney Street
Barney Street was named for Commodore Joshua Barney, among the man who fought off the British in 1814.
Barney Street was named for Commodore Joshua Barney, among the man who fought off the British in 1814. (Baltimore Sun file photo)
What's in a name: Barre Street
Named for Col. Isaac Barre, a member of the House of Commons who was a dfender of the colonies back in England.
Named for Col. Isaac Barre, a member of the House of Commons who was a dfender of the colonies back in England. (Baltimore Sun file photo)
What's in a name: Bayard Street
Named for James Bayard, a Federalist who was elected to the Senate and died not long after returning from negotiating a treaty to end the War of 1812. Pictured: a section of Bayard Street is renamed "Casino Way" in honor of the new Horseshoe Casino.
Named for James Bayard, a Federalist who was elected to the Senate and died not long after returning from negotiating a treaty to end the War of 1812. Pictured: a section of Bayard Street is renamed "Casino Way" in honor of the new Horseshoe Casino. (Barbara Haddock Taylor / Baltimore Sun)
What's in a name: Bellona Avenue
Named by James Beatty -- a manufacturer of gunpowder at the time of the War of 1812 -- after the mythical Roman goddess of war.
Named by James Beatty -- a manufacturer of gunpowder at the time of the War of 1812 -- after the mythical Roman goddess of war. (CHRIS DETRICK / Baltimore Sun)
What's in a name: Benson Avenue
Named for Oregon Randolph Benson, whose family owned farmland in the area that's now referred to as Halethorpe. Benson was a local politician.
Named for Oregon Randolph Benson, whose family owned farmland in the area that's now referred to as Halethorpe. Benson was a local politician. (Baltimore Sun file photo)
What's in a name: Bentalou Street
Named for a French cavalryman, Paul Bentalou, who came to America with Lafayette to help the Colonies during the revolution.
Named for a French cavalryman, Paul Bentalou, who came to America with Lafayette to help the Colonies during the revolution. (BARBARA HADDOCK TAYLOR / Baltimore Sun)
What's in a name: Biddle Street
The street likely is named for Catherine Biddle, the daughter of a Philadelphia politician who married a wealthy Baltimore man, George Lux.
The street likely is named for Catherine Biddle, the daughter of a Philadelphia politician who married a wealthy Baltimore man, George Lux. (Baltimore Sun file photo)
What's in a name: Bryant Avenue
The street is believed to be named for the 1800s poet and journalist William Cullen Bryant. The street is among a handful — including Whittier and Ruskin avenues — named by William Morris Orem, who owned a large Baltimore estate called Auchentoroly.
The street is believed to be named for the 1800s poet and journalist William Cullen Bryant. The street is among a handful — including Whittier and Ruskin avenues — named by William Morris Orem, who owned a large Baltimore estate called Auchentoroly. (CHRIS DETRICK / Baltimore Sun)
What's in a name: Bonaparte Avenue
Bonaparte Avenue is named for not the more famous Napolean, but the family of his brother — Jerome. The family line of the Baltimore Bonapartes came to an end in 1945.
Bonaparte Avenue is named for not the more famous Napolean, but the family of his brother — Jerome. The family line of the Baltimore Bonapartes came to an end in 1945. (KENNETH K. LAM / Baltimore Sun)
What's in a name: Bond Street
Bond Street is named for John Bond, a Quaker who moved to Fells Point shortly after William Fell. Bond Street crosses Aliceanna Street, which is likely named for Aliceanna Webster Bond — the wife of John Bond.
Bond Street is named for John Bond, a Quaker who moved to Fells Point shortly after William Fell. Bond Street crosses Aliceanna Street, which is likely named for Aliceanna Webster Bond — the wife of John Bond. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
What's in a name: Bouldin Street
Bouldin Street is named for Jehu Bouldin, a local surveyor who assisted in mapping Baltimore.
Bouldin Street is named for Jehu Bouldin, a local surveyor who assisted in mapping Baltimore. (Baltimore Sun file photo)
What's in a name: Brehm Lane
Brehms Lane is so named because it used to be used and owned by the brewery run by George Brehm in the late 1800s into the 1900s.
Brehms Lane is so named because it used to be used and owned by the brewery run by George Brehm in the late 1800s into the 1900s. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
What's in a name: Caton Avenue
Caton Avenue bares the name of Englishman Richard Caton, who married Polly Polly Carroll, the daughter of Charles Carroll, a signer of the Declaration of Independence and at the time the weatlthiest man in America. He failed at a number of business ventures, but developed Catonsville.
Caton Avenue bares the name of Englishman Richard Caton, who married Polly Polly Carroll, the daughter of Charles Carroll, a signer of the Declaration of Independence and at the time the weatlthiest man in America. He failed at a number of business ventures, but developed Catonsville. (Christopher T. Assaf / Baltimore Sun)
What's in a name: Cylburn Avenue
Cylburn Avenue takes its name from the property in North Baltimore that is now home to the Cylburn Arboretum and mansion.
Cylburn Avenue takes its name from the property in North Baltimore that is now home to the Cylburn Arboretum and mansion. (Baltimore Sun file photo)
What's in a name: Eager Street
Named for Maryland native and Revolutionary War leader Col. John Eager Howard.
Named for Maryland native and Revolutionary War leader Col. John Eager Howard. (Baltimore Sun file photo)
What's in a name: Eden Street
Eden Street is a tribute to the last royal governor of Maryland, Sir Robert Eden. He was appointed to the governorship by Lord Baltimore, and was married to Caroline Calvert, Baltimore's sister.
Eden Street is a tribute to the last royal governor of Maryland, Sir Robert Eden. He was appointed to the governorship by Lord Baltimore, and was married to Caroline Calvert, Baltimore's sister. (Baltimore Sun file photo)
What's in a name: Edmondson Avenue
Dr. Thomas Edmondson was one of Baltimore's first patrons of the fine arts, and upon his passing, part of his estate was dedicated to the city as a park. Harlem Park took the name of his estate, and nearby Thompson Street was changed to Edmondson Avenue.
Dr. Thomas Edmondson was one of Baltimore's first patrons of the fine arts, and upon his passing, part of his estate was dedicated to the city as a park. Harlem Park took the name of his estate, and nearby Thompson Street was changed to Edmondson Avenue. (Baltimore Sun file photo)
What's in a name: Erdman Avenue
Erdman Avenue was named for the family that settled in portions of East Baltimore in the 1800s and may have given up property in order for the road to be cut through.
Erdman Avenue was named for the family that settled in portions of East Baltimore in the 1800s and may have given up property in order for the road to be cut through. (Kim Hairston / Baltimore Sun)
What's in a name: Eutaw Street
Today Eutaw Street is most recognizable to fans at Oriole Park at Camden Yards. But its origins date back to a bloody battle during the Revolution. Maryland native Col. John Eager Howard became closely identified with a battle at Eutaw Springs in 1781. The people of Baltimore named the street after the battle.
Today Eutaw Street is most recognizable to fans at Oriole Park at Camden Yards. But its origins date back to a bloody battle during the Revolution. Maryland native Col. John Eager Howard became closely identified with a battle at Eutaw Springs in 1781. The people of Baltimore named the street after the battle. (Jerry Jackson / Baltimore Sun)
What's in a name: Fait Avenue
Named for William Fait, who owned a canning factory on the Canton shore that sold canned varietys of Chesapeake Bay seafood.
Named for William Fait, who owned a canning factory on the Canton shore that sold canned varietys of Chesapeake Bay seafood. (Jen Rynda / Baltimore Sun Media Group)
What's in a name: Fayette Street
Fayette Street was named for Marquis de Lafayette, the French-born Revolutionary War leader. Lafayette's name is used on a variety of public places in Maryland, including on Lafayette Square and Lafayette Avenue in the city.
Fayette Street was named for Marquis de Lafayette, the French-born Revolutionary War leader. Lafayette's name is used on a variety of public places in Maryland, including on Lafayette Square and Lafayette Avenue in the city. (Baltimore Sun file photo)
What's in a name: Fleet Street
The precise history of the naming of Fleet Street is unclear, though many were led to believe it was named after Fleet Street in London, which is home to the burial ground of George Calvert, the first Lord Baltimore.
The precise history of the naming of Fleet Street is unclear, though many were led to believe it was named after Fleet Street in London, which is home to the burial ground of George Calvert, the first Lord Baltimore. (Baltimore Sun file photo)
What's in a name: Gay Street
Gay Street is named for Nicholas Ruxton Gay, a surveyor who planned out much of the area in the 1700s.
Gay Street is named for Nicholas Ruxton Gay, a surveyor who planned out much of the area in the 1700s. (Baltimore Sun file photo)
What's in a name: Gilmor Street
Gilmor Street carries the name of the Gilmor Family, a prominent business family in the late 1700s and early 1800s. The families ties to Baltimore began when Robert Gilmor formed a business partnership and made Baltimore its headquarters.
Gilmor Street carries the name of the Gilmor Family, a prominent business family in the late 1700s and early 1800s. The families ties to Baltimore began when Robert Gilmor formed a business partnership and made Baltimore its headquarters. (Baltimore Sun file photo)
What's in a name: Gough Street
Gough Street is named for Harry Dorsey Gough, one of the wealthiest men in Baltimore in the late 1700s.
Gough Street is named for Harry Dorsey Gough, one of the wealthiest men in Baltimore in the late 1700s. (Baltimore Sun file photo)
What's in a name: Hanover Street
Hanover Street is named for teh family of royals that produed King George III of England, who ruled during and after the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812.
Hanover Street is named for teh family of royals that produed King George III of England, who ruled during and after the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. (Baltimore Sun file photo)
What's in a name: Hillen Road
Hillen Road is named for the Hillen Family, which produced the city's youngest mayor — Solomon Hillen Jr.
Hillen Road is named for the Hillen Family, which produced the city's youngest mayor — Solomon Hillen Jr. (Karl Merton Ferron / Baltimore Sun)
What's in a name: Key Highway
Key Highway is named for Francis Scott Key, the lawyer and poet who penned "The Star Spangled Banner" while held captive on a ship watching Fort McHenry. Here, an undated view of the harbor from Key Highway.<br/>
Key Highway is named for Francis Scott Key, the lawyer and poet who penned "The Star Spangled Banner" while held captive on a ship watching Fort McHenry. Here, an undated view of the harbor from Key Highway.
(Baltimore Sun archives)
What's in a name: Light Street
Light Street was so named when someone translated the name of Capt. Darby Lux, an English sea captain, into English.
Light Street was so named when someone translated the name of Capt. Darby Lux, an English sea captain, into English. (CHRIS DETRICK / Baltimore Sun)
What's in a name: Lombard Street
The actual origin of Lombard Street in Baltimore is up for debate, though many believe it was given the name due to its similarities to the busy Lombard Street in London.
The actual origin of Lombard Street in Baltimore is up for debate, though many believe it was given the name due to its similarities to the busy Lombard Street in London. (Baltimore Sun file photo)
What's in a name: McElderry Street
McElderry Street — often spelled without the second R — is named for Thomas McElderry, who had a hand in the city's early development. Initially a businessman, he assiste d in the development of a penitentiary and a new courthouse before being elected to the State Senate. Initially, a street along the waterfront was to be named for McElderry, but upon his death, a street opened on the property he owned in northeast Baltimore was given his name.
McElderry Street — often spelled without the second R — is named for Thomas McElderry, who had a hand in the city's early development. Initially a businessman, he assiste d in the development of a penitentiary and a new courthouse before being elected to the State Senate. Initially, a street along the waterfront was to be named for McElderry, but upon his death, a street opened on the property he owned in northeast Baltimore was given his name. (Baltimore Sun file photo)
What's in a name: Mondawmin Avenue
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow looked out over a rolling, corn-covered portion of Baltimore and called it "Mondamin" — the Indian word for a cornfield. The name was altered over the years, but has remained as the title of both a neighborhood and the avenue.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow looked out over a rolling, corn-covered portion of Baltimore and called it "Mondamin" — the Indian word for a cornfield. The name was altered over the years, but has remained as the title of both a neighborhood and the avenue. (CHRIS DETRICK / Baltimore Sun)
What's in a name: Mosher Street
Col. James Mosher was a Revolutionary War soldier from Massachusetts who came to Baltimore, where he would become a businessman and politician.
Col. James Mosher was a Revolutionary War soldier from Massachusetts who came to Baltimore, where he would become a businessman and politician. (Barbara Haddock Taylor / Baltimore Sun)
What's in a name: O'Donnell Street
O'Donnell Street is named for John O'Donnell, who as a young man got into the shipping trade, and after finding success, purchased a 1,981-acre plantation that he renamed "Canton" — the neighborhood in southeast Baltimore carries the name to this day.
O'Donnell Street is named for John O'Donnell, who as a young man got into the shipping trade, and after finding success, purchased a 1,981-acre plantation that he renamed "Canton" — the neighborhood in southeast Baltimore carries the name to this day. (Barbara Haddock Taylor / Baltimore Sun)
What's in a name: Payson Street
Payson Street — here, a section is renamed in honor of DJ Reggie Reg — is named for a figure who helped oversee Baltimore's development in the late 1700s and early 1800s. He was a businessman and politician, who was involved in banking and insurance and served nine terms on the City Council.
Payson Street — here, a section is renamed in honor of DJ Reggie Reg — is named for a figure who helped oversee Baltimore's development in the late 1700s and early 1800s. He was a businessman and politician, who was involved in banking and insurance and served nine terms on the City Council. (Algerina Perna / Baltimore Sun)
What's in a name: Presstman Street
Presstman Street in West Baltimore is named for Benjamin Presstman, a councilman, city solicitor and judge.
Presstman Street in West Baltimore is named for Benjamin Presstman, a councilman, city solicitor and judge. (Karl Merton Ferron / Baltimore Sun)
What's in a name: Poppleton Street
Poppleton Street is named for English surveyor Thomas H. Poppleton, who was hired to survey the city to map it. He was provided an assistant: Jehu Bouldin, after whom Bouldin Street is named.
Poppleton Street is named for English surveyor Thomas H. Poppleton, who was hired to survey the city to map it. He was provided an assistant: Jehu Bouldin, after whom Bouldin Street is named. (Gene Sweeney Jr. / Baltimore Sun)
What's in a name: Potee Street
John Edgar Potee was a popular resident of South Baltimore's Brooklyn neighborhood and served as sheriff of Anne Arundel County and sheriff of Baltimore. When a southern section of Race Street was rebuilt, neighborhood residents asked for it to be named for the longtime political figure.
John Edgar Potee was a popular resident of South Baltimore's Brooklyn neighborhood and served as sheriff of Anne Arundel County and sheriff of Baltimore. When a southern section of Race Street was rebuilt, neighborhood residents asked for it to be named for the longtime political figure. (Baltimore Sun file photo)
What's in a name: Pratt Street
Pratt Street is one of the city's primary thoroughfares along the Inner Harbor, and it carries the name of Charles Pratt — the Earl of Camden. He fought hard to repeal the Stamp Act — which was to be imposed upon the colonies. It is believed that Camden Street may be named for him, as well. Here is a west-looking view of Pratt Street in 1972.
Pratt Street is one of the city's primary thoroughfares along the Inner Harbor, and it carries the name of Charles Pratt — the Earl of Camden. He fought hard to repeal the Stamp Act — which was to be imposed upon the colonies. It is believed that Camden Street may be named for him, as well. Here is a west-looking view of Pratt Street in 1972. (Baltimore Sun file photo)
What's in a name: Redwood Street
Initially called German Street, Redwood Street came to be in 1918 when it was so named by a city ordinance. It was named for a Baltimore family that produced Francis Redwood, a longtime businessman, and George Redwood, a newspaperman.
Initially called German Street, Redwood Street came to be in 1918 when it was so named by a city ordinance. It was named for a Baltimore family that produced Francis Redwood, a longtime businessman, and George Redwood, a newspaperman. (Baltimore Sun file photo)
What's in a name: Russell Street
Alexander Russell owned a brickyard along the Patapsco River. It produced the bricks used in a number of notable properties around the country, and became one of America's top brick producers.
Alexander Russell owned a brickyard along the Patapsco River. It produced the bricks used in a number of notable properties around the country, and became one of America's top brick producers. (Baltimore Sun file photo)
What's in a name: San Martin Drive
San Martin Drive, the winding road that borders Johns Hopkins University and Wyman Park, was dedicated in 1950 as a token of international friendship and goodwill. It is named for Gen. Jose de San Martin, an Argentine military man who played a key role in South America's battle for independence.
San Martin Drive, the winding road that borders Johns Hopkins University and Wyman Park, was dedicated in 1950 as a token of international friendship and goodwill. It is named for Gen. Jose de San Martin, an Argentine military man who played a key role in South America's battle for independence. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
What's in a name: Stricker Street
Col. John Stricker is widely considered the father of the Maryland National Guard. He organized the Maryland militia, and led a successful defense of the city in the Battle of North Point. He later declined election to the State Senate and re-appointment to lead the militia.
Col. John Stricker is widely considered the father of the Maryland National Guard. He organized the Maryland militia, and led a successful defense of the city in the Battle of North Point. He later declined election to the State Senate and re-appointment to lead the militia. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
What's in a name: Thames Street
Thames Street on the Fells Point waterfront likely was named after the Thames River by William Fell or one of his relatives, historians believe. Thames Street in London was also named for the river.
Thames Street on the Fells Point waterfront likely was named after the Thames River by William Fell or one of his relatives, historians believe. Thames Street in London was also named for the river. (Karl Merton Ferron / Baltimore Sun)
What's in a name: Whittier Avenue
The street is believed to be named for the 1800s Quaker poet John Greenleaf Whittier. The street is among a handful — including Bryant and Ruskin avenues — named by William Morris Orem, who owned a large Baltimore estate called Auchentoroly.
The street is believed to be named for the 1800s Quaker poet John Greenleaf Whittier. The street is among a handful — including Bryant and Ruskin avenues — named by William Morris Orem, who owned a large Baltimore estate called Auchentoroly. (CHRIS DETRICK / Baltimore Sun)
What's in a name: Wilkens Avenue
Wilkens Avenue was named for the man who gave to the city the property over which it travels. William Wilkens gave Baltimore 33 acres of his estate with the goal of enabling affordable housing.
Wilkens Avenue was named for the man who gave to the city the property over which it travels. William Wilkens gave Baltimore 33 acres of his estate with the goal of enabling affordable housing. (Baltimore Sun file photo)
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