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Baltimore Councilman on Freddie Gray: 'How did we get to that point?'

A day after Freddie Gray's death, one city official says he is seeking answers to questions he's asked before.

City Councilman Brandon M. Scott, vice chairman of the public safety committee, said he's starting the day with more questions than answers in Gray's death.

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"How did we get to that point? How does someone end up having a medical emergency? How did that happen?" Scott said. "We keep seeming to have this same conversation over and over again. We have got to figure out a way for all of us to get past this, to not have families suffering, to not have all of this anger."

Scott shifted some responsibility to lawmakers in Annapolis, who ended the 90-day session this month without passing several key reforms the city sought to improve the relationships between the police and the community. Two of the doomed proposals were to update the Law Enforcement Officers' Bill of Rights, making it easier to discipline problem officers, and another spelling out when and how police should wear body cameras.

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"Just a lot of questions is what it really comes down to," Scott said. "I want answers immediately. The community wants answers immediately. The mayor wants answers immediately. The commissioner wants answers immediately, but the law is the law for now."

In the meantime, Scott said the public is right to protest, "because that's the American way."

"We should be angry any time someone dies in our city," Scott said. "We should protest… We have to make sure we do it in peaceful manner."

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