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While Baltimore often makes national headlines for its high homicide rate, some of the worst violence in Maryland in 2018 played out elsewhere. A southern Maryland High School. An Annapolis newspaper office. A Harford County warehouse. A Perry Hall neighborhood.
The Baltimore Police Department faced an unprecedented number of challenges in 2018 that included leadership turnover, cases of officer misconduct, continued high levels of violence and the final convictions in one of the biggest police corruption scandals in city history.
At its core, 2018 was defined not by games but by the complex and sometimes tragic stories that accompany them.
2018 brought a few happy headlines to Baltimore Sun readers. Cal Ripken, Jr. found love, Amy Sherald painted Michelle Obama, the Bay got better and “Mr. Oriole” came back.
The past year brought a slew of changes to Baltimore’s food landscape. That meant welcoming a crop of new upstarts while bidding adieu to some familiar faces.
Who were the winners and losers in Maryland politics in 2018?
In addition to the five employees killed in June in the shootings at the Annapolis Capital, the region lost a number of notable citizens in 2018. Here, we recall some of those who left a lasting mark.
Baltimore-area businesses weathered failed deals, layoffs, closings and restructuring in 2018. But some started new chapters by expanding or merging, and new development sprouted all over and one new industry spread like a weed.
Baltimore arts groups from the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture to the Maryland Film Festival experienced change in 2018.
Six months later, the mass shooting at the Capital Gazette newsroom remains a defining event, for survivors, of course, but also the Annapolis community and the journalism profession.
Although President Donald Trump has little to do with running local governments in Maryland, he played an outsize role in politics here in 2018. Trump’s actions prompted backlash among the electorate, which in November voted out several high-profile Republicans in the state.
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