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Timeline of allegations against Dixon

2004
Jan. 15: Dixon uses a $2,000 gift certificate for a furrier, purchased by an employee of "Developer A," to buy a Persian lamb coat and burnt umber mink coat.

Jan. 23: Developer A, while at the Ritz Carlton in Avon, Colo., uses his American Express card to pay for $257.94 in expenses incurred by Dixon and charged to the developer's room.

Feb. 18 to Feb. 20: Developer A uses his credit card to charge more than $3,200 in travel, meals, lodging and other expenses while he and Dixon are in New York City. The charges are paid by Developer A's company.

March 16: An employee of Developer A charges on his personal credit card $1,518.20 for a plane ticket from Baltimore to Chicago for a passenger listed as Sheila Dixon.

March 24: Developer A charges $371.88 in toners, brushes, facial cleansers and moisturizers at Saks Fifth Avenue in Chicago.

March 25: Dixon uses her American Express card to charge $7,853.17 at Chicago stores including Saks, Giorgio, Coach and St. John Boutique, as part of more than $9,500 in charges during the trip.

April 2: Minutes after the last of three calls between Dixon's cell phone and Developer A's cell phone, another of the developer's employees cashes a corporate check for $15,000, which he gives to the developer.

April 9: $6,000 in cash is deposited by ATM into Dixon's checking account.

May 6: Dixon hands 40 $100 bills to a city employee and asks him to deposit the money into his personal bank account and write a $4,000 check toward her American Express bill. Three hours after the employee makes the deposit, Developer A calls Dixon's private number.

May 7: The city employee writes a $4,000 check on his account for payment of Dixon's American Express bill.

May 8: Dixon writes a $4,000 check payable to American Express.

May 10: $2,000 in cash is deposited into Dixon's savings account. A call is made from Dixon's cell phone to Developer A's cell phone.

Dec. 16: An employee of Developer A cashes a $2,000 corporate check, listed in the stub entry as "cash donations for needy families." That afternoon, Dixon calls Developer A twice. That night, 15 Best Buy gift cards for $50 each are bought with cash, and two of them are later used by Dixon toward the purchase of a video game, CDs and DVDs.

2005
Dec. 13: Another employee of Developer A cashes a $1,500 corporate check for "Christmas gift card." Dixon asks "Developer B" to buy gift cards for needy Baltimore families, and the developer uses a personal credit card to buy $500 in Best Buy gift cards and $500 in Target gift cards.

Dec. 14 to 15: Amid calls between phones connected to the Developer A employee and Dixon, $950 in Target gift cards are bought with cash.

Dec. 18 to Jan. 29, 2006: In a series of shopping trips to Best Buy and Target, Dixon uses 21 gift cards bought by Developer B, along with the gift cards bought with cash, toward merchandise including a digital camcorder, a PlayStation 2 controller and other electronics.

2006
Dec. 21-23: Dixon uses gift cards that had been bought by an employee of Developer A toward electronics and clothing. A city employee uses gift cards bought by the Developer A employee to buy a Sony PlayStation Portable, using Dixon's address and home phone number. At a holiday office party, Dixon gives another city employee a Sony PlayStation Portable and distributes various gift cards to her staff and others.

2007
Dec. 12, 17: A city housing employee buys Toys "R" Us gift cards for distribution to underprivileged children during the Mayor's Holly Trolley event Dec. 20.

Dec. 21: Dixon gives to a member of her staff a Toys "R" Us gift card purchased by the city housing employee.

2008
June 17: Five of the Toys "R" Us gift cards bought by the city housing employee are found at Dixon's home.

what's next
•Dixon will enter a plea at her arraignment in Baltimore Circuit Court in the next few weeks.

•The mayor's attorneys say they will ask a judge to dismiss all charges.

•Dixon will remain in office, continuing to oversee the powerful Board of Estimates spending panel, unless she is convicted.


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