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200-year-old gravesite discovered | PHOTOS

Dave Oshman, president of Marshy Point nature center council (left), and Daniel Dean, research chair with Marshy Point nature center council stand behind a recovered tombstone that includes the name “Cassandor Hamilton,” which is the burial place of Cassandra Hamilton, who was born in the 1700s and died in 1794.
(Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun)

200-year-old gravesite discovered | PHOTOS

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The tombstone for Cassandra Hamilton, who died in 1794, was found.
Marshy Point
Dave Oshman, president of Marshy Point nature center council (left), and Daniel Dean, research chair with Marshy Point nature center council stand behind a recovered tombstone that includes the name “Cassandor Hamilton,” which is the burial place of Cassandra Hamilton, who was born in the 1700s and died in 1794.
Dave Oshman, president of Marshy Point nature center council (left), and Daniel Dean, research chair with Marshy Point nature center council stand behind a recovered tombstone that includes the name “Cassandor Hamilton,” which is the burial place of Cassandra Hamilton, who was born in the 1700s and died in 1794. (Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun)
Two-hundred-year-old grave site discovered
Dave Oshman, president of Marshy Point nature center council (left) and Daniel Dean, research chair with Marshy Point nature center council stand behind a recovered tombstone that reads the name, “Cassandor Hamilton,” which is the burial place of Cassandra Hamilton, born in the 1700s and who died in 1794.
Dave Oshman, president of Marshy Point nature center council (left) and Daniel Dean, research chair with Marshy Point nature center council stand behind a recovered tombstone that reads the name, “Cassandor Hamilton,” which is the burial place of Cassandra Hamilton, born in the 1700s and who died in 1794. (Karl Merton Ferron/The Baltimore Sun)
Two-hundred-year-old grave site discovered
Dave Oshman, president of Marshy Point nature center council is framed by a forked red maple while standing beside the recovered tombstone.
Dave Oshman, president of Marshy Point nature center council is framed by a forked red maple while standing beside the recovered tombstone. (Karl Merton Ferron/The Baltimore Sun)
Two-hundred-year-old grave site discovered
Daniel Dean, research chair with Marshy Point nature center council walks through woods toward a cemetery with the recovered tombstone.
Daniel Dean, research chair with Marshy Point nature center council walks through woods toward a cemetery with the recovered tombstone. (Karl Merton Ferron/The Baltimore Sun)
Two-hundred-year-old grave site discovered
Dave Oshman, president of Marshy Point nature center council examines a recovered tombstone that reads the name, “Cassandor Hamilton,” which is the burial place of Cassandra Hamilton.
Dave Oshman, president of Marshy Point nature center council examines a recovered tombstone that reads the name, “Cassandor Hamilton,” which is the burial place of Cassandra Hamilton. (Karl Merton Ferron/The Baltimore Sun)
Two-hundred-year-old grave site discovered
Daniel Dean, research chair with Marshy Point nature center council examines an area scan that revealed numerous possible burial sites around the recovered tombstone.
Daniel Dean, research chair with Marshy Point nature center council examines an area scan that revealed numerous possible burial sites around the recovered tombstone. (Karl Merton Ferron/The Baltimore Sun)
Two-hundred-year-old grave site discovered
Daniel Dean, research chair with Marshy Point nature center council watches Dave Oshman, president of Marshy Point nature center council, who begins making paces to estimate the length of a family cemetery, which is the burial place of Cassandra Hamilton, born in the 1700s and who died in 1794.
Daniel Dean, research chair with Marshy Point nature center council watches Dave Oshman, president of Marshy Point nature center council, who begins making paces to estimate the length of a family cemetery, which is the burial place of Cassandra Hamilton, born in the 1700s and who died in 1794. (Karl Merton Ferron/The Baltimore Sun)
Two-hundred-year-old grave site discovered
Dave Oshman, president of Marshy Point nature center council wipes dirt from a recovered tombstone that reads the name, “Cassandor Hamilton,” which is the burial place of Cassandra Hamilton.
Dave Oshman, president of Marshy Point nature center council wipes dirt from a recovered tombstone that reads the name, “Cassandor Hamilton,” which is the burial place of Cassandra Hamilton. (Karl Merton Ferron/The Baltimore Sun)
Two-hundred-year-old grave site discovered
A recovered tombstone that reads the name, “Cassandor Hamilton,” which is the burial place of Cassandra Hamilton, born in the 1700s and who died in 1794, stands between a forked red maple tree.
A recovered tombstone that reads the name, “Cassandor Hamilton,” which is the burial place of Cassandra Hamilton, born in the 1700s and who died in 1794, stands between a forked red maple tree. (Karl Merton Ferron/The Baltimore Sun)
Two-hundred-year-old grave site discovered
Daniel Dean, research chair with Marshy Point nature center council casts his shadow next to a recovered tombstone that reads the name, “Cassandor Hamilton.”
Daniel Dean, research chair with Marshy Point nature center council casts his shadow next to a recovered tombstone that reads the name, “Cassandor Hamilton.” (Karl Merton Ferron/The Baltimore Sun)
Two-hundred-year-old grave site discovered
Dave Oshman, president of Marshy Point nature center council looks around the woods toward a family cemetery which is the burial place of Cassandra Hamilton, born in the 1700s and who died in 1794.
Dave Oshman, president of Marshy Point nature center council looks around the woods toward a family cemetery which is the burial place of Cassandra Hamilton, born in the 1700s and who died in 1794. (Karl Merton Ferron/The Baltimore Sun)
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