xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">

Nearly a year of shutdown | PHOTOS

Jenn Ambrosiano-Reedholm shares her home office with her son, Kyle Reedholm, 13. A portable large TV screen, hooked up to Kyle's laptop, allows Kyle's mom to monitor his online classes. She and her husband Erik Reedholm have developed a comfortable rhythm during the pandemic, offering support when their children need help, while working online themselves from their Cockeysville home.
(Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)

Nearly a year of shutdown | PHOTOS

Advertisement
Advertisement
Families and students are coping with a shutdown due to COVID-19 that has lasted almost a year.
One year of shutdown
Jenn Ambrosiano-Reedholm shares her home office with her son, Kyle Reedholm, 13. A portable large TV screen, hooked up to Kyle's laptop, allows Kyle's mom to monitor his online classes. She and her husband Erik Reedholm have developed a comfortable rhythm during the pandemic, offering support when their children need help, while working online themselves from their Cockeysville home.
Jenn Ambrosiano-Reedholm shares her home office with her son, Kyle Reedholm, 13. A portable large TV screen, hooked up to Kyle's laptop, allows Kyle's mom to monitor his online classes. She and her husband Erik Reedholm have developed a comfortable rhythm during the pandemic, offering support when their children need help, while working online themselves from their Cockeysville home. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
One year of shutdown
Matthew Reedholm, 8, visits the basement office to ask a question of his father, Erik Reedholm, a procurement specialist for a government contractor. The three Reedholm children know that if their father has his headphones on, that he should not be disturbed.
Matthew Reedholm, 8, visits the basement office to ask a question of his father, Erik Reedholm, a procurement specialist for a government contractor. The three Reedholm children know that if their father has his headphones on, that he should not be disturbed. (Amy Davis)
One year of shutdown
Ashley Reedholm, 12, a sixth grader at Cockeysville Middle School, has the privacy of her bedroom for her online classes. She has to keep her bearded dragon, Duke, from climbing on her keyboard. Ashley reports that she misses her friends during the pandemic.
Ashley Reedholm, 12, a sixth grader at Cockeysville Middle School, has the privacy of her bedroom for her online classes. She has to keep her bearded dragon, Duke, from climbing on her keyboard. Ashley reports that she misses her friends during the pandemic. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
One year of shutdown
Ashley Reedholm, 12, seated on the floor, occasionally sets up her laptop in the living room for variety. While still on lunch break, her brothers, Kyle, 13, left, and Matthew, 8, watch the daily workout from her gym teacher, as her parents, Jenn Ambrosiano-Reedholm and Erik Reedholm, also look on. The Cockeysvillle family finds moments to be together during meals and other breaks from screen time during the school day.
Ashley Reedholm, 12, seated on the floor, occasionally sets up her laptop in the living room for variety. While still on lunch break, her brothers, Kyle, 13, left, and Matthew, 8, watch the daily workout from her gym teacher, as her parents, Jenn Ambrosiano-Reedholm and Erik Reedholm, also look on. The Cockeysvillle family finds moments to be together during meals and other breaks from screen time during the school day. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
One year of shutdown
Kyle Reedholm, 13, an eighth grader at Cockeysville Middle School, sometimes has his bearded dragon, Lizzy, for company while engaged in his online learning. Even so, Kyle said it was more boring being confined to his home for classes.
Kyle Reedholm, 13, an eighth grader at Cockeysville Middle School, sometimes has his bearded dragon, Lizzy, for company while engaged in his online learning. Even so, Kyle said it was more boring being confined to his home for classes. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
One year of shutdown
One advantage to taking online classes at home for Kyle Reedholm, 13, is that during class breaks he can play the piano. Kyle is in the eighth grade at Cockeysville Middle School.
One advantage to taking online classes at home for Kyle Reedholm, 13, is that during class breaks he can play the piano. Kyle is in the eighth grade at Cockeysville Middle School. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
One year of shutdown
Matthew Reedholm, 8, a third grader at Warren Elementary School, has a desk in his bedroom for online learning. He is now an expert at making his own pizza for lunch.
Matthew Reedholm, 8, a third grader at Warren Elementary School, has a desk in his bedroom for online learning. He is now an expert at making his own pizza for lunch. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
One year of shutdown
Jenn Ambrosiano-Reedholm and her children, from left, Matthew, 8, Kyle, 13, and Ashley, 12, fix lunch at their Cockeysville home. Usually, Erik Reedholm joins the family at lunchtime, but on this day he had a business call during their lunch break.
Jenn Ambrosiano-Reedholm and her children, from left, Matthew, 8, Kyle, 13, and Ashley, 12, fix lunch at their Cockeysville home. Usually, Erik Reedholm joins the family at lunchtime, but on this day he had a business call during their lunch break. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
RowdyOrb.it helps bring internet to residents in Brooklyn and Curtis Bar
Jonathan Butler attaches the wifi antenna that will bering internet to parts of Brooklyn as RowdyOrb.it and the United Way of Central Maryland partner to bring Internet service to residents of Brooklyn and Curtis Bay.
Jonathan Butler attaches the wifi antenna that will bering internet to parts of Brooklyn as RowdyOrb.it and the United Way of Central Maryland partner to bring Internet service to residents of Brooklyn and Curtis Bay. (Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun)
RowdyOrb.it helps bring internet to residents in Brooklyn and Curtis Bar
Employees of RowdyOrb.it head to the roof of the City of Refuge building in Brooklyn to install one of several wifi hotspots that will provide internet service to the Brooklyn and Curtis Bay neighborhoods.
Employees of RowdyOrb.it head to the roof of the City of Refuge building in Brooklyn to install one of several wifi hotspots that will provide internet service to the Brooklyn and Curtis Bay neighborhoods. (Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun)
RowdyOrb.it helps bring internet to residents in Brooklyn and Curtis Bar
L-R Matthew Johnson and Mohammed Aiyeloja help set up a rooftop wifi antenna that is being installed by RowdyOrb.it on a roof in the 3500 block of Seventh Street in Brooklyn. This will help provide internet access to local residents of Brooklyn along Seventh Street.
L-R Matthew Johnson and Mohammed Aiyeloja help set up a rooftop wifi antenna that is being installed by RowdyOrb.it on a roof in the 3500 block of Seventh Street in Brooklyn. This will help provide internet access to local residents of Brooklyn along Seventh Street. (Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun)
RowdyOrb.it helps bring internet to residents in Brooklyn and Curtis Bar
Matthew Johnson and Mohammed Aiyeloja help set up the stand for the rooftop wifi antenna that is being installed by RowdyOrb.it in Brooklyn. They along with United Way of Central Maryland are in a partnership to bring Internet service to Brooklyn and Curtis Bay.
Matthew Johnson and Mohammed Aiyeloja help set up the stand for the rooftop wifi antenna that is being installed by RowdyOrb.it in Brooklyn. They along with United Way of Central Maryland are in a partnership to bring Internet service to Brooklyn and Curtis Bay. (Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun)
RowdyOrb.it helps bring internet to residents in Brooklyn and Curtis Bar
Jonathan Moore is the founder & CEO of RowdyOrb.it and he along with United Way of Central Maryland are in a partnership to bring internet service to Brooklyn and Curtis Bay. Moore is setting up rooftop antennas to provide a hi-speed wifi hotspot for local residents.
Jonathan Moore is the founder & CEO of RowdyOrb.it and he along with United Way of Central Maryland are in a partnership to bring internet service to Brooklyn and Curtis Bay. Moore is setting up rooftop antennas to provide a hi-speed wifi hotspot for local residents. (Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun)
RowdyOrb.it helps bring internet to residents in Brooklyn and Curtis Bar
Jonathan Moore is the founder & CEO of RowdyOrb.it and he along with United Way of Central Maryland are in a partnership to bring internet service to Brooklyn and Curtis Bay. Moore is setting up rooftop antennas to provide high speed wifi hotspots for local residents.
Jonathan Moore is the founder & CEO of RowdyOrb.it and he along with United Way of Central Maryland are in a partnership to bring internet service to Brooklyn and Curtis Bay. Moore is setting up rooftop antennas to provide high speed wifi hotspots for local residents. (Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun)
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement