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Drug paraphernalia decriminalization consideration | PHOTOS

Harriet Smith, director of education/services at the Baltimore Harm Reduction Coalition in Charles Village, holds a bag of syringes that are bundled in small quantities to give to clients in a paper bag with other sterile supplies as a public health measure. She is also holding a black plastic bag filled with food snacks to give out. Cam Kerr, the community outreach coordinator, is at left. The Coalition, one of several state-approved groups that provide clean supplies to keep drug users safe, supports a law that would decriminalize the possession of drug paraphernalia. The bill, vetoed by Gov. Larry Hogan, will be up for a veto override in December.
(Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)

Drug paraphernalia decriminalization consideration | PHOTOS

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Maryland lawmakers to weigh decriminalizing needles and other drug paraphernalia.
(Amy Davis)
Syringe Veto Override
Harriet Smith, director of education/services at the Baltimore Harm Reduction Coalition in Charles Village, holds a bag of syringes that are bundled in small quantities to give to clients in a paper bag with other sterile supplies as a public health measure. She is also holding a black plastic bag filled with food snacks to give out. Cam Kerr, the community outreach coordinator, is at left. The Coalition, one of several state-approved groups that provide clean supplies to keep drug users safe, supports a law that would decriminalize the possession of drug paraphernalia. The bill, vetoed by Gov. Larry Hogan, will be up for a veto override in December.
Harriet Smith, director of education/services at the Baltimore Harm Reduction Coalition in Charles Village, holds a bag of syringes that are bundled in small quantities to give to clients in a paper bag with other sterile supplies as a public health measure. She is also holding a black plastic bag filled with food snacks to give out. Cam Kerr, the community outreach coordinator, is at left. The Coalition, one of several state-approved groups that provide clean supplies to keep drug users safe, supports a law that would decriminalize the possession of drug paraphernalia. The bill, vetoed by Gov. Larry Hogan, will be up for a veto override in December. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
Syringe Veto Override
Harriet Smith, director of education/services at the Baltimore Harm Reduction Coalition holds a bag of sterile drug paraphernalia supplies that are given out at their Charles Village office and at three other city locations.
Harriet Smith, director of education/services at the Baltimore Harm Reduction Coalition holds a bag of sterile drug paraphernalia supplies that are given out at their Charles Village office and at three other city locations. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
Syringe Veto Override
Volunteer Kirah Aldinger-Gibson, a graduate nursing student at Johns Hopkins University, separates opened and unopened packages of Naloxone from a donation given to the Baltimore Harm Reduction Coalition.
Volunteer Kirah Aldinger-Gibson, a graduate nursing student at Johns Hopkins University, separates opened and unopened packages of Naloxone from a donation given to the Baltimore Harm Reduction Coalition. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
Syringe Veto Override
Naloxone, packaged with instructions, is one of the items given out by the Baltimore Harm Reduction Coalition outreach workers as part of their public health mission to keep drug users safer with clean supplies. The Coalition, a state-approved group, supports a law that would decriminalize the possession of drug paraphernalia.
Naloxone, packaged with instructions, is one of the items given out by the Baltimore Harm Reduction Coalition outreach workers as part of their public health mission to keep drug users safer with clean supplies. The Coalition, a state-approved group, supports a law that would decriminalize the possession of drug paraphernalia. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
Syringe Veto Override
Sterile drug paraphernalia supplies given to drug users as a public health measure include, clockwise from lower left, syringes, non-latex ties, alcohol wipes, cottons which filter out larger particles from drug solutions, cookers and sterile water ampules.
Sterile drug paraphernalia supplies given to drug users as a public health measure include, clockwise from lower left, syringes, non-latex ties, alcohol wipes, cottons which filter out larger particles from drug solutions, cookers and sterile water ampules. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
Syringe Veto Override
Fentanyl testing strips are one of the items given out by the Baltimore Harm Reduction Coalition outreach workers as part of their public health mission to keep drug users safer with clean supplies. The Coalition, a state-approved group, supports a law that would decriminalize the possession of drug paraphernalia. The bill, vetoed by Gov. Larry Hogan, will be up for a veto override in December.
Fentanyl testing strips are one of the items given out by the Baltimore Harm Reduction Coalition outreach workers as part of their public health mission to keep drug users safer with clean supplies. The Coalition, a state-approved group, supports a law that would decriminalize the possession of drug paraphernalia. The bill, vetoed by Gov. Larry Hogan, will be up for a veto override in December. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
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