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Good Morning, Baltimore: Need to know for Thursday

Molly Shattuck, 47, estranged wife of former Constellation Energy CEO Mayo Shattuck and a former Ravens cheerleader, has been charged with rape and sexual contact with a 15-year-old boy.

A former Ravens cheerleader is making national headlines this morning. Maryland's govenor-elect pledges a bi-partisan approach to his administration. Here's what you need to know to start your Thursday.

WEATHER

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"Rain rain go away, come again another day." Aside from today being rainy with a chance of thunderstorms, we're in for a sunny weekend with a chance of a shower on Sunday. Temperatures will reach a high of 63 today, with a low of 42 overnight. Winds will be out of the south-southwest at 10 to 20 mph.

TRAFFIC

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TRENDING THIS MORNING

Still not caught up on results from Election Day 2014? Check our Election Center for results of local and national races.

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FROM LAST NIGHT

The Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity has been suspended by Johns Hopkins University officials in the wake of the alleged rape of a 16-year-old girl that took place Saturday night in the fraternity's St. Paul Street house.

Customers who shop in Baltimore would have to pay five cents for each plastic bag at supermarkets and other merchants under legislation that's making its way through the City Council.

TODAY'S FRONT PAGE

Governor-elect Larry Hogan promises to establish a bi-partisan administration, but offered few specifics on how he would govern Maryland.

Ex-Ravens cheerleader Molly Shattuck, 47, who was married to former Constellation Energy CEO Mayo A, Shattuck III, was arrested Wednesday in Delaware. She was charged with third-degree rape and unlawful sexual contact with a 15-year-old boy, Delaware State Police said.

State health officials are monitoring about 100 people who have traveled from Ebola-stricken countries, but won't disclose more information about their cases unless someone tests positive for the deadly virus.

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