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Last Chase Lloyd House resident finds housing

After almost two months of anxiety and uncertainty, Fran Taccetta can start the next chapter of her life.

Taccetta thought she’d have more time in the last chapter. The Chase Lloyd home in downtown Annapolis housed older women in need like her for 135 years. But in one of a few recent plot twists, Taccetta’s five years there ended abruptly.

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“It’s been horrendous,” she said.

Taccetta is the last of the home’s five former residents to find a place to go after they were told on June 5 they had 30 days to leave the historic house on Maryland Avenue. Peggy Pickall, president of the nonprofit home’s board of trustees, said the house is unsafe to live in without necessary repairs to the wiring and fire escape.

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Anne Arundel County Legal Aid attorney Lisa Sarro took up the case for Taccetta and another resident who faced homelessness, fighting for the Chase home’s board to put them up in a hotel for a month. But a week before the deal she secured was set to run out, Sarro was abruptly fired from Maryland Legal Aid.

Without Sarro’s help, Taccetta was unsure if she faced mounting hotel charges while still looking for a place to go after Friday. But her application to an affordable apartment in Queenstown went through just in time.

“Nothing was easy. Since it’s wrapping up I think it’s going to be great,” Taccetta said. “I’m feeling a lot better. I’m so grateful for that.”

The Anne Arundel County Department of Aging and Disabilities has secured funding to help Taccetta pay for her move as well as the last few nights she’ll need to stay in the hotel.

“We are passionate advocates and are dedicated to connecting individuals with the resources they need on a daily basis and in critical situations,” said Department of Aging acting director Karrisa Gouin.

In the meantime, the home’s board of trustees is seeking a historic architect to start the renovations necessary to get women back in the home. Pickall said in a previous interview that the home would return to its original purpose once renovations are complete, but was unsure of when that would be. She and the board’s lawyer, Rob Lourie, did not respond for further comment.

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