Advertisement

Anne Arundel County announces two new water quality projects for South River watershed

Glebe Bay which runs into the Back River and the Chesapeake Bay. Oyster gardeners return oysters to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation which will plant them on sanctuary reefs, where they can live, filter, and reproduce among other oysters. (Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun)
Glebe Bay which runs into the Back River and the Chesapeake Bay. Oyster gardeners return oysters to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation which will plant them on sanctuary reefs, where they can live, filter, and reproduce among other oysters. (Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun) (Lloyd Fox / Baltimore Sun)

Anne Arundel County has committed funding to two projects — totaling $8 million — that aim to improve water quality within the South River watershed.

The largest portion of funding is directed toward the Glebe Branch Stream restoration. The project is currently in the design phase and is estimated to cost $7.8 million. Improvements to the stream include greater floodplain connectivity, alleviating erosion and protecting the wetlands. Construction on the project is estimated to begin in 2020.

Advertisement

"Our administration has undertaken the largest waterway improvement effort in county history," County Executive Steve Schuh said in a statement. "These projects demonstrate Anne Arundel County's unwavering commitment to improving the water quality of the South River and its tributaries."

The other project is the much smaller living shoreline at Turnbull Estates. Anne Arundel County Watershed Protection and Restoration Program has partnered with the South River Federation for the $110,000 project.

The living shoreline is expected to include native oysters and aims to reduce erosion and bolster the habitat for other native species. Living shorelines are made up of natural items including rocks, plants and other materials. Construction on the project is expected to begin in early 2019.

The two projects are part of the county's $250 million, six-year waterway improvement plan. Federal requirements spurred the county to invest in improvements to a variety of water and stormwater projects.



Advertisement
Advertisement