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Annapolis girl soars past challenges to earn Eagle Scout title

Heather Doyen, 15, stands with the Leopold bench/directional signpost (depending on which pic you choose) she led a group of scouts in building at Goshen Farms in Annapolis. Doyen is one of the first girls in Scouts BSA to qualify for its highest title of Eagle Scout.
Heather Doyen, 15, stands with the Leopold bench/directional signpost (depending on which pic you choose) she led a group of scouts in building at Goshen Farms in Annapolis. Doyen is one of the first girls in Scouts BSA to qualify for its highest title of Eagle Scout. (Selene San Felice)

Heather Doyen knows she confuses people.

The 15-year-old Annapolis girl is often asked why she joined the Boy Scouts (rebranded last year as the gender-inclusive Scouts BSA). She tells people Scouts BSA is more of the challenge she wanted.

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But even Scouts BSA might not be challenging enough. At 15, she’s one of the first girls in Scouts BSA to qualify for its highest Eagle title.

“She hit every mark as early as possible,” her father, Bill Doyen, said.

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Heather started out as a Girl Scout but envied the challenges she saw her brothers go through as Boy Scouts. She helped found the first all-girl Scouts BSA troop in the area, Troop 995 G, a year and a half ago, which has expanded from its original seven members to 16.

"All the camping we do is a lot of fun, and all the friends I’ve made along the way, have been my best part,” Heather said.

Heather is her troop’s senior patrol leader and was recently elected by members of her troop to Order of the Arrow, the Scouts BSA’s honor society. In July, she completed the project to earn her the Eagle title — beating her twin brother to it.

“She really stuck with it and it’s her own drive that got her here,” her mom, Diane Doyen, said.

Heather led her troop in building five Leopold benches and two-directional signposts at Cape St. Claire’s Goshen Park, where she’s grown up playing.

Completing the project during the coronavirus pandemic was a challenge since Scouts BSA allows only 10 scouts to gather at a time. But still, she put in about 200 hours to have the project complete.

The last step before she’s officially an Eagle, the Board of Review, has been delayed for coronavirus concerns. Heather will be inducted with a group of girls in October.

“There’s lots of glass ceilings that have broken in recent history. I’m very proud that my daughter is a leader in this group,” Bill Doyen said.

Heather plans to be active as a scout until she ages out of the program when she’s 18.

“I’m excited and honored to soon be an Eagle Scout. I can’t wait to see what else comes my way,” she said. “I’m earning leadership skills I know will serve me for the rest of my life.”

Heather Doyen, 15, stands with the Leopold bench/directional signpost (depending on which pic you choose) she led a group of scouts in building at Goshen Farms in Annapolis. Doyen is one of the first girls in Scouts BSA to qualify for its highest title of Eagle Scout.
Heather Doyen, 15, stands with the Leopold bench/directional signpost (depending on which pic you choose) she led a group of scouts in building at Goshen Farms in Annapolis. Doyen is one of the first girls in Scouts BSA to qualify for its highest title of Eagle Scout. (Selene San Felice)

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