The Bowie-Blade News sent a questionnaire to candidates for City Council. Their full responses are listed below. Answers from mayoral candidates will be added at a later date.

District 1 Candidates

Michael Estève

What is your name, age and what district do you live in?

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Michael Estève; 29; District 1

What office are you seeking?

City Council, District 1

What is your background? Please include education, work and prior public service.

DeMatha Catholic High School, Loyola University Maryland; Banking and marketing; Volunteer organizer for the USO, Wounded Warrior Project, and Maryland Special Olympics .

Please provide links to relevant social media pages and campaign websites:

What issues have you talked about the most on the campaign trail, and how would you address those concerns in office? Please list as many as you would like, and denote which is the most urgent in your view.

I’m committed to continuing to improve core city functions, deliver proactive constituent services, and listen to residents on matters that impact their quality of life. My main goals are to ensure the city’s public safety and code officers have the resources and personnel to do their jobs well, maintain a reasonable property tax rate, keep municipal debt to a minimum, maintain our AAA bond rating, and continue to prioritize those core services Bowie residents support and enjoy.

If elected, how would you approach development in Bowie? What would you do in office to influence, or not influence, growth in the area?

First, we need to restore public trust in the development process and amend our local election laws to prevent developers and their representatives from exerting influence in local elections. Then, we need to build on current development policies with new, more comprehensive smart- growth standards as other communities have done. Developers appreciate consistent rules and residents want to know that new development promotes quality of life.

What transportation issues are a priority?

When it comes to transportation, public safety is my biggest priority. I’m working with resident groups on a Complete Streets policy to improve driver, biker, and pedestrian safety throughout the city. I’m also working with county and state lawmakers to fund the installation of sidewalks and traffic calming measures, especially in Old Bowie, with the added goal of improving walkability and connectivity to the historic downtown.

Abigail Snyder

What is your name, age and what district do you live in?

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Abigail Snyder, 27, District 1

What office are you seeking?

District 1 City Council seat

What is your background? Please include education, work and prior public service.

I graduated from Bowie High School, and received a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology with a minor in Chemistry from Towson University. By age 13, I received a proclamation from Mayor G. Frederick Robinson for over 300 hours of service to the City of Bowie and its residents. I began my leadership experience in high school, serving as President of my youth group at Temple Solel (on Mitchellville Rd.), Vice President of Membership and Philanthropy

Chairman for Delta Delta Delta, and a 3 year position as Department Coordinator at Sughrue Mion, PLLC before assuming my latest title as legal secretary for two Partners at the firm. In my spare time, I enjoy coaching figure skating (am currently a privately contracted coach at the City of Bowie Ice Arena) and volunteering for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

Please provide links to relevant social media pages and campaign websites:

www.abigailsnyder.org, facebook.com/abigailsnyderforbowie, Twitter and Instagram: @voteabigail

What issues have you talked about the most on the campaign trail, and how would you address those concerns in office? Please list as many as you would like, and denote which is the most urgent in your view.

We have maintained a balanced budget, have a AAA bond rating, and have been able to start a police department for the city without having to raise taxes (although it was perceived that by now we would have had to raise them at least $0.08) by tapping into our reserve to cover the BPD finances. A de cit is a non-issue, because we have 65-70% of the amount we budget per year in our reserve. A AAA bond rating is only given when there is a long and strong history of sound financial management. Because we are so financially stable, we are in a place to be able to promote the three pillars on which the City of Bowie stands - growth, unity, and progress. It is important that we continue to provide amenities to the residents of the city, and opportunities to responsibly increase housing so that the city may continue to grow.

If elected, how would you approach development in Bowie? What would you do in office to influence, or not influence, growth in the area?

It is important that the city continues to move forward responsibly with its development projects. We have been presented with opportunities to increase housing in Melford, South Lake, Amber Ridge, and are still required to build the apartments at Marketplace as part of the contract that was signed. It is our responsibility as a Council to ensure that our roads are properly sustained, our traffic conditions are assessed regularly, our schools have enough room for new students that would come from these developments, etc. However, by being dismissive to all growth in the City of Bowie without consideration of these factors is simply irresponsible, and detrimental to the progress of our community. If elected, I would push to responsibly assess opportunities for growth, while also ensuring that the state of our city does not suffer by putting focus on new projects.

What transportation issues are a priority?

Traffic conditions in the City of Bowie are a big concern for both myself and my constituents going into this upcoming election. I think it is extremely important that we work together as a Council to find solutions to these problems. Perhaps 4 way stops, more signage where appropriate, and/or speed humps in the neighborhoods that are now being used as traffic outlets for the ever-increasing backup on our major highways. Though we must move forward responsibly with new development projects in an effort to maintain the City of Bowie’s ranking as the best city to live in the State of Maryland, we must simultaneously address and find solutions for the influx of heavy traffic and its affects in turn on our neighborhoods.

District 2 Candidate

What is your name, age and what district do you live in?

Dufour Woolfley, age 54, and District 2 Resident.

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What office are you seeking?

District 2 Councilmember

What is your background? Please include education, work and prior public service.

Please see CV

Please provide links to relevant social media pages and campaign websites:

www.woolfley.com and Facebook: Councilman Dufour Woolfley

What issues have you talked about the most on the campaign trail, and how would you address those concerns in office? Please list as many as you would like, and denote which is the most urgent in your view.

It’s not what I’ve been talking about, but what residents have been saying that is of interest. I’ve spent an extensive amount of time knocking on doors and speaking directly with members of the community. The number one issue is clearly over-development and its attendant side effects, particularly traffic volume and speeding, with school crowding and green space also a concern. Taxes continue to be a major concern for residents as well. Additionally, citizens feel that their elected representatives are non-responsive and do not reflect their interests, instead favoring those of developers.

• I will continue to work to mitigate the impact of Melford on Belair Drive and District 2 as a whole and help residents get traffic calming devices for their neighborhood streets if they are so inclined.

• I will continue working with community, state, local, and church representatives to prevent the over-development of the Jesuit property and will continue to oppose its annexation so the developer cannot have access to City water--making it harder to develop.

• Working with community members and legislators, I helped stop the construction of apartments at Hilltop Plaza, and I will oppose any similar proposals in the future.

• I’m committed to a balanced budget with no tax increases, while preserving outstanding services — that means fields and gyms for our children, exceptional services for our seniors, top-flight trash and recycling services, excellent snow removal, a well-maintained water and sewer system, and a well-managed City government.

If elected, how would you approach development in Bowie? What would you do in office to influence, or not influence, growth in the area?

I’ll propose that the City reject the application for annexation of the Jesuit property to ensure that City water and sewer services remain unavailable, thus reducing the chance for the project to move forward. I’ll also work with City staff and the residents of District 2 to reduce and calm traffic in a collaborative and iterative manner.

I will continue to oppose the gratuitous support we’ve provided to developers as a whole. The most egregious example being the recent $10 million in tax increment funding provided to the developers of the Karington property which City tax revenues will have to pay off.

Any development in Bowie needs to revolve around areas with adequate traffic facilities and be consistent with existing neighborhoods and uses.

What transportation issues are a priority?

The number one issue is clearly over-development and its attendant side effects, particularly traffic volume and speeding. I will continue to work to mitigate the impact of Melford on Belair Drive and District 2 as a whole and help residents get traffic calming devices for their neighborhood streets if they are so inclined.

At the state level, the top transportation improvement project is the upgrade of MD 197 between US Route 50 and MD 450. I’ve been and advocate for improvements to Routes 3 and 301 as well as MD 450.

District 3 Candidates

Mike Byrd

What is your name, age and what district do you live in?

Mike Byrd, 51, District 3.

What office are you seeking?

City Councilman, District 3

What is your background? Please include education, work and prior public service.

I have over 30 years of progressive military and executive managerial experiences—both professionally and personally. All my experiences have one underlying trait—Service!

Retired USMC aviator and combat veteran. Graduate of the United States Naval Academy (BS- Mechanical Eng) and Darden School of Business, UVa (MBA).

During my military career, I served as a AH-1W Cobra pilot and held various leadership positions, to include but not limited to: Department Head of Aviation Enlisted Assignments at Marine Corps Headquarters, Director of Squadron Safety and Standardization at MCAS Camp Pendleton CA, Wing Aviation Safety Officer in Charge at Cherry Point/New River Air Station NC, Squadron Maintenance Test Pilot, and Officer in Charge of numerous squadron maintenance shops. I have directly managed and lead varying sized USMC units in peacetime and combat operations.

Currently, I am the Founder and Managing Principal of a Bowie-based business management rm, “Sydian Systems, LLC”. Sydian provides consultative support to small and medium-sized businesses with strategic planning, business development cycle management, and project/program management services. Prior to the establishment of Sydian Systems, I have worked in the federal contracting space for publicly-traded and private entities; holding positions as Operations Manager, VP of Business Development and Chief Operating Officer.

I have been married for 16 years to a native Prince Georgian from Upper Marlboro--Stacy. We decided to move to the City of Bowie because of its melding of community attributes with wholesome family values; its progressive economic atmosphere; and, its promising ecosystem of “Live-Play-Work” elements. We are the proud parents of Sydney,15 and Ian,13.

Listed below is a listing of my recent and relevant volunteer civic involvement:

  • - Chairman; City of Bowie Advisory Planning Board (BAPB)
  • - Marine Corps League
  • - Former Advisory Board member; Prince George’s Tech Council
  • - Former Board member; Holy Trinity Episcopal School Board of Trustees
  • - Former Lacrosse Coach; Bowie Boys and Girls Club
  • - Former Vice President; Woodmore Estates HOA
  • - Former Treasurer; Woodmore Estates HOA
  • - Former Cubmaster; Pack 403
  • - Contributing Editor; 2016 Bowie Sustainability Plan
  • - Facilitator; IMAGINE Bowie

Please provide links to relevant social media pages and campaign websites:

What issues have you talked about the most on the campaign trail, and how would you address those concerns in office? Please list as many as you would like, and denote which is the most urgent in your view.

op 2 issues: 1. Development, or the perception of over-development I have discussed my idea of "Smart Planning to yield Smart Growth". More speci cally, our City Council with support from Joe Meinert's Planning Department should take a more in-depth holistic introspection of the impact to the Bowie eco-system from a proposed development project.The impact to infrastructure, public works, environment, social equality (the people), school support, etc. Measurable indicators or metrics should be established above and beyond what's required by the current General/Master Plan guidelines. This detailed listing of factors or "Go-No Go" criteria shall be used as a strategic development decision-making tool. It will also highlight elements of mitigation for any elements of the proposal that are subpar. As a city councilman, I will insure Developers understand their proposed development project must meet or exceed current guidelines and take into account the socio-economic impact to the Bowie community. I believe every development project should serve a strategic purpose--there needs to be a Bowie-centric planned bene t for any/all development projects. Due to our lack of Bowie-autonomous zoning authority, recent developments are being forced upon the citizens of Bowie by others who don't seem to understand nor appreciate the impact of those projects other than increased property tax revenue. Bowie has unsuccessfully attempted to secure autonomous zoning authority from MNCPPC in the past. This is a daunting task which I believe will not come to fruition for years to come; however, I truly believe it needs to be revisited with a more detailed work-study and irrefutable business case development. As a newly-elected councilman, I will spearhead the feasibility study of forming a working group consisting of various reps from City Manager's o ce, City Attorney's o ce, Bowie City and Prince George's County Planning Department, and urban planning consultation from the University of Maryland's School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation. I am pro-development, but I truly believe we/City of Bowie need to reduce the amount of development within the City until we can properly implement a detailed project integration plan which addresses all facets of the Bowie ecosystem.

2. Taxes, or the perception of paying too much for what Many citizens have expressed their concern that Bowie citizens are required to pay additional city taxes yet they don’t see the bene t. This discussion leads to a dialogue in which I politely educate the citizen regarding the Tax Differential that is extended to the City residents by the County. Basically, I explain the numerous services that Bowie residents receive and how much of a premium they would be required to pay in another neighboring municipality to receive the same services. I also politely remind citizens that our city taxes have not significantly increased for the past 8 years while our quality of services have increased--i.e...expansion of our police force, superlative public works programs, etc.

Of most urgency to me and the one issue that encompasses ALL issues--improve civic engagement! I intend to inspire more citizens to become more engaged pertaining to City affairs and issues. First step is establishing effective two-way communications. There are a myriad of sources a citizen can use to obtain City information, but many folks are unaware or just complacent. I plan to stand up scheduled town hall meetings throughout District 3 and form community task groups or contact teams for each neighborhood (approx 30 in District 3). I will facilitate and moderate these hard-scheduled meetings once a quarter. Information sharing and gathering will be the primary objectives. Information ow from me (City Council rep) to the citizens and feedback from the citizens to me. Effective and collaborative communication is crucial. Citizens knowledge and understanding concerning a certain issue or Bowie program is paramount and leads to “buy-in” by the City’s #1 stakeholders--the residents!

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If elected, how would you approach development in Bowie? What would you do in office to influence, or not influence, growth in the area?

(See my “Development” response above) I am pro-development, but only after the proposed project has been thoroughly vetted by Bowie City representatives and “buy-in” from Bowie citizens has been obtained.

What transportation issues are a priority?

I have 2 priorities: 1. More effective lobbying for Bowie transportation issues on the County and State yearly Transportation Priorities Lists to include, but not limited to, Church Road corridor, Belair Drive/Melford Blvd, Rt 197 between Rt 50 and Rt 450, 301 between Rt 197 and Central Ave.

2. In my opinion, the City of Bowie is very fragmented. There exists numerous neighborhoods throughout the city but to visit most neighborhoods, a citizen requires a car to travel to them. I understand the city has grown signi cantly over the last two decades, but a good majority of the City is unwalkable or unbikable. Bowie is considered a multimodal community but I would argue--the primary mode of travel is by car. The Bowie City Trails Master Plan is currently up for review by the City Council. It appears to be a great foundation document, but I don’t believe it answers the basic question: What keeps people from walking?

Adrian Boafo

What is your name, age and what district do you live in?

Adrian Boafo, 25, living in District 3 (Longleaf Community)

What office are you seeking?

City Council District 3

What is your background? Please include education, work and prior public service.

Adrian Boafo has called Bowie home his entire life. He is a graduate of DeMatha Catholic High School, where he was an active member of their nationally recognized choral program. Adrian is an alumnus of the University of Baltimore, graduating in 2016 with a Bachelors in Government & Public Policy. In college, Adrian was an active student leader, serving as the university’s first African-American Student Government President. He was then appointed by the University System’s of Maryland Student Council to serve as the Vice President of Undergraduate Affairs, advocating on behalf of all Maryland students enrolled in one of the 12 public institutions.

After graduation, Adrian spent his professional career working for Members of the United States House of Representatives. First, he joined the House Democratic Caucus as a press intern under the leadership of then-Representative Xavier Becerra (CA-34). Later, he joined the office of Congressman Ruben Kihuen (NV-04) working as a National Press Assistant.

Currently, Adrian works as Campaign Manager of Hoyer for Congress, the Maryland political organization and campaign representing Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (MD-05). Adrian will complete his graduate degree at American University’s Kogod School of Business in December of 2019.

Please provide links to relevant social media pages and campaign websites:

www.AdrianBoafo.com Twitter/Instagram - @AdrianBoafo www.facebook.com/adrianboafo

What issues have you talked about the most on the campaign trail, and how would you address those concerns in office? Please list as many as you would like, and denote which is the most urgent in your view.

As I’m knocking on doors and talking to voters, I’ve heard various issues. Transportation/Traffic, Bowie Town Center/Smart Economic Growth & Public Safety are among the most brought up. Below are my platforms on the following issues:

Smart Economic Growth Adrian is committed to ensuring that property values in Bowie continue to increase and that the city remains in a strong economic position. Adrian believes the city of Bowie should be focused on increasing the commercial tax base while redeveloping aging and deteriorating shopping centers. As a son of a small business owner in Bowie, Adrian wants to find new ways to bring businesses into the city while retaining the businesses we have.

Adrian wants the city of Bowie to be more involved with The 21st Century School Facilities Commission, also known as the Knott Commission, and the Maryland State Delegation to ensure prioritization for our local schools, leading to economic growth in the city.

As a representative for District 3, Adrian plans to lead the conversation about what should happen with the Sears lot in the Bowie Town Center. He is committed to ensuring that all stakeholders have ample time and ability to lend their opinions.

Improving Traffic Adrian believes that an ongoing issue for city residents is traffic. He believes that improved traffic will help grow the economy, create jobs and make life, and commutes, easier for residents. Adrian plans to work with county and state officials to find the best solutions to improve heavily traveled city roads (mainly Church Road in District 3), including U.S. Route 301 and U.S. Route 197.

If elected, how would you approach development in Bowie? What would you do in office to influence, or not influence, growth in the area?

As a lifelong resident in this city, development has been an on-going issue that residents encounter. The first thing I’d do is look at the new proposed developments to make sure the infrastructure is there before development. The biggest issue is that the city/county decides to just build without taking a long strategic look at external impacts.

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Additionally, if elected I plan to work closely with Washington Prime and residents to make sure Bowie Town Center becomes the strong regional economic powerhouse we all know it could be.

What transportation issues are a priority?

In District 3, Church Road has become the biggest priority. With an unfortunate death, development of an ice arena and the county’s proposed plans for high-density housing. That area is bound to be even more highly traveled than normal. I plan to work with county and state officials to find solutions to Church Road.

This is a symptom of current leadership not paying attention to current infrastructure conditions.

Dave Grogan

What is your name, age and what district do you live in?

Dave Grogan, 53 District#3 Legislative District 23B

What office are you seeking?

Bowie City Council District #3

What is your background? Please include education, work and prior public service.

Military, Corporate Security, Public Safety, Marketing, Community Advocacy, Health/Wellness and Education-Bowie State University BS Degree Sociology/Criminal Justice, Graduate of the Federal Law Enforcement Training Academy Glynco, Ga. and served 25 years with Department of Justice United States Marshal Service,Graduate of Paris Island Served 6 years in the U.S. Marine Corps, and 2 terms on the City of Bowie Education Committee.

Please provide links to relevant social media pages and campaign websites:

Website- http://www.ElectDaveGroganNow.com Facebook- Grogan For Bowie City Council & Friends of Dave Grogan Elect Grogan Now

What issues have you talked about the most on the campaign trail, and how would you address those concerns in office? Please list as many as you would like, and denote which is the most urgent in your view.

The issue that I have discussed most on the campaign trail is education. Constituents want to make sure that we maintain and continue to improve the high standard of education afforded our children. As a father, education has always been a high priority for me and is why I was EXCITED to serve on the City of Bowie Education Committee. One of the most important things this experience taught me most is that we have GREAT students because we have GREAT teachers. That said I would use my office to bring more resources to teachers especially from the business community. And though my office doesn’t have a direct impact on teacher’s salary I will most definitely be an advocate for and supportive of the Prince George’s County Teachers Union in every way possible. Our campaign will also be an educational experience through weekly newsletters. We welcome all residence of Bowie to join our newsletter distribution network. Everything we do has a purpose which is centered around some form a education. My grandmother was a career professional educator and my mom was a scholar.

Quality development is another issue (see question ). I also have a MAJOR spot in my heart for our seniors. Prior to my mom transitioning to Heaven in 2015, I strongly encouraged her to move to the City of Bowie. The City of Bowie is a great place for seniors; however, I would love to see more technology training for our most important population. I will put together a Techy Senior Campaign through a local non-pro t organization(s) using County grants such as the Special Appropriation and Non-Departmental Grants to develop a senior curriculum (i.e. Twitter, Instagram, etc.) designed to tie them more easily into available City of Bowie, County and corporate resources such as the Office of Emergency Preparedness (Make A Plan) and PEPCO (Energy Assistance). I truly believe our seniors can be the most tech savvy in the County if not the state and our program can be model for others. To my surprise, the closing of A. C. Moore at the Bowie Town Center is a concern I’ve heard over and over. That is why when we are canvass the neighborhood, we are asking individuals to sign our petition that we will send to A. C. Moore, their landlord, and County officials in hopes – although a long shot -- that it will make a difference.

If elected, how would you approach development in Bowie? What would you do in office to influence, or not influence, growth in the area?

First, I believe in quality development that compliments -- not totally change the character of (i.e. high-rise construction in a single-family community) – our neighborhoods. When elected I will approach development from more citizen friendly perspective. I will form a Community Development Coalition with a representative from the 30 major neighborhoods within District 3. This group will meet at least quarterly and discuss current and future projects slated for the City of Bowie. Just as important, we will use this opportunity to educate the community about the development process with guest speakers who are major stakeholders in the process (i.e. developers, lawyers, Parks & Planning Commissioners, etc.). Thus a MORE educated constituency will help with more quality development and increased community participation. In addition, I will fight for local zoning authority. I believe strongly that the City of Bowie’s growth should be in the hands of the City and not the County like other major cities throughout the State of Maryland.

What transportation issues are a priority?

Transportation priorities will include working with and monitoring existing/new development projects to ensure that our streets are not overburdened and in some cases further overburdened from additional traffic. I would like to see the Counties bus system -- The Bus-- have a greater presence in the City of Bowie especially connecting citizens to the Metro. As a health, wellness and fitness guru, I’m am amazed at the number of runners/walkers/bikers/health enthusiast that I have observed on the campaign trail. I would like to commission a study to see if the City of Bowie, not the County, could improve our trails and bike lanes and take advantage of our health conscience population while generating income from the various sharing programs (bike-sharing, scooters, etc.)

Darian Senn-Carter

What is your name, age and what district do you live in?

Dr. Darian Senn-Carter, 32, District 3

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What office are you seeking?

City Council, District 3

What is your background? Please include education, work and prior public service.

Dr. Darian Senn-Carter is a candidate for the City Council for Bowie District 3. Most recently, he was appointed to serve as District 3 Councilmember for the City of Bowie and is now running for a full term. Dr. Senn-Carter is a certified First Responder/EMT and currently a Professor of Homeland Security and Criminal Justice. He serves as an advisor, volunteer and mentor in a number of programs throughout the community. Dr. Senn-Carter has over 15 years of comprehensive experience in education, the public and private sector.

Dr. Senn-Carter is a nationally recognized leader and proven community organizer. As a member of the City Council Dr. Senn-Carter is the Council liaison to the Arts Committee and the Community Outreach Committee within the City of Bowie and Community Engagement Committee Member within the Maryland Municipal League. With the understanding that the residents of Bowie are impacted by every initiative and decision, he works to bring a philosophy of community engagement and strategic planning to ensure the unity, progress, and growth of the City of Bowie, to transform the lives of others to build a better future.

Dr. Senn-Carter has earned a Doctorate of Education in Educational Leadership from Edgewood College, a Master of Science in Homeland Security Management from Towson University, a Bachelor of Arts in Criminology & Criminal Justice from the University of Maryland, College Park and is an International Coach Federation (ICF) certified Life Coach. He is a resident of the En eld Chase community of Bowie.

Please provide links to relevant social media pages and campaign websites:

What issues have you talked about the most on the campaign trail, and how would you address those concerns in office? Please list as many as you would like, and denote which is the most urgent in your view.

It is my belief that what we do as individuals and more importantly together has the power to truly make a difference in the lives of others. The time, thought and energy that we invest into our community is what builds the foundation for success.

Constituent Services* Assisting constituents is my most important and meaningful responsibility. It is my

philosophy that at the end of every initiative and decision residents of Bowie are impacted and to put my neighbors and fellow residents first. With an emphasis on community engagement I believe that we may continue to transform lives to build a better future. My priority is to continue to strengthen community relationships and to deepen the connection as the liaison between the City of Bowie and residents emphasizing how the City Council may best serve resident’s interests.

Strategic Budgeting and Fiscal Management Budget planning that reflects the vision and priorities of Bowie. Focus on maintaining a balanced budget, improving the city’s core services, keeping tax rates at and fiscal management to maintain city resources.

Public Safety Commitment to accountable public safety and emergency planning in the areas of mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery to serve and protect our residents and community.

Sustainability and Green Bowie Protecting Bowie’s green spaces and to utilize the Bowie Sustainability Plan to ensure economic, environmental and social sustainability. Improving water, recycling, waste and food recovery efforts. There is an opportunity to develop strategies and best practices to incorporate sustainability planning in every aspect of city operations.

If elected, how would you approach development in Bowie? What would you do in office to influence, or not influence, growth in the area?

We must not only tolerate and embrace change but promote positive change. As development occurs around the City of Bowie. We have an opportunity to promote positive development that is reflective of the rich history and legacy of the City of Bowie and to remain a prominent and vibrant community committed to growth, unity and progress. Smart development requires input from residents of Bowie throughout every phase of development. Ensure that development is in alignment with the City of Bowie Strategic Plan and that infrastructure supports development.

What transportation issues are a priority?

Resident safety with implementation of City Complete Streets Policy *Northview Drive recent concept plan to enhance crosswalks along Northview Drive near Allen Pond Park *Church Road improvements due to current and ongoing development

Local road improvements to include *MD 197 widening for traffic improvement *MD 450 to ensure safety and calm traffic *US 301 traffic improvements to support demographic changes (population and development within and around the City of Bowie) *MD 3 to address safety and improve traffic *Mitchellville and Excalibur Roads - updated tra c study to explore fully signalized turn *Mt Oak Road and Nottinghill Drive - updated traffic study to explore full tra c signal (currently a three-way intersection stop)

Collaborating with developers to include traffic studies and enhancements as a component of development *Melford - MD 301 *Karington/Southlake - Addition of lane on MD 301, MD 214

*Mill Branch - traffic study, intersection enhancement and widening of 301

Kevin Motley

What is your name, age and what district do you live in?

Kevin Motley 47 I live in District 3

What office are you seeking?

City Councilman for District #3

What is your background? Please include education, work and prior public service.

I am a 22 year Union Ironworker with Ironworkers Local 5. I hold a position as Elder at Friendship Church Outreach Ministry. I am also the Founder of Area 51 Ministries. Area 51 Ministries provides mentorship to challenged youth and young adults. Area 51 also provides help to those that are homeless and displaced in the MD/DC Metropolitan Area. We provide resources and services to those who just need a nudge into our American dream. I also serve as the President of Friendship Cares, an outreach organization in Fairmont Heights, Maryland founded by Dr. Bonnie Hunter. I also get to host an up and coming radio show, in which I founded, Black Sheep Radio. My radio show airs weekly on WBGR internet radio, Apple TV, Roku Firestick and WBGR Network TV. The purpose of Black Sheep Radio is to inform our people of topics less talked about and discuss relevant popular topics that our viewers inquire about weekly.

Please provide links to relevant social media pages and campaign websites:

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What issues have you talked about the most on the campaign trail, and how would you address those concerns in office? Please list as many as you would like, and denote which is the most urgent in your view.

Community Infrastructure, Schools, Zoning & Urban Development, Diversity, Public Safety and Public Relations are my prominent concerns for our city. You can go to kevinmotley4bowie.com and click on Platforms to see my stance on these issues.

If elected, how would you approach development in Bowie? What would you do in office to influence, or not influence, growth in the area?

If elected, I would address Bowie’s outdated plans of development. District 3A, for instance, has aged roads and the traffic plan for the Ice Rink and upcoming home developments at Freeway Airport are examples of outdated plans that text amendments nullify. The text amendments that the county agreed on are unfair to the district. I’d try to advocate for residents of the city to be more inclusive on development planning and inform residents of code regulations and their rights to participate in upholding the community value to a high standard. I feel residents need to be informed before development and planning begins. I believe the solution to this problem begins with “WE THE PEOPLE.” We must unify with the people in leadership. I feel that reaching people with information is the beginning of a more unified Bowie.

What transportation issues are a priority?

Bowie is a very diverse city. Bowie’s infrastructure and transportation issues all need new studies to reflect the growth of the city. Speed mediation is a must in some neighborhoods especially on Church Rd. Public transportation is a need in the 3B corridor. Creating new studies would tailor the transportation needs to the people that use it the most.

District 4 Candidates

Antonio Lindsey

What is your name, age and what district do you live in?

Antonio D. Lindsey, 46, District 4

What office are you seeking?

Bowie City Councilman District 4

What is your background? Please include education, work and prior public service.

Blue collar worker & Entrepreneur - over 20 yrs.

Educator 4 yrs.

Federal Police Officer 4 yrs.

Public Speaker 7 yrs.

Assistant Director of Outreach - 1/2016 - 8/16

Outreach Director - 2/13 - 11/14

UM 1997 Master Computer Info. Management, UM 1995 Bachelors Psychology

Please provide links to relevant social media pages and campaign websites:

What issues have you talked about the most on the campaign trail, and how would you address those concerns in office? Please list as many as you would like, and denote which is the most urgent in your view.

Reducing taxes for citizens and businesses. Bringing in more business to the city. Job creation, Safety & Infrastructure. Promote city solar power. Review city for Nauruan right & retirement programs to provide all employees with appropriate benefits. Promote sensible & sustainable development instead of more congestion for the city.

If elected, how would you approach development in Bowie? What would you do in office to influence, or not influence, growth in the area?

When I’m elected, I will approach development in Bowie by reviewing sensible & sustainable development projects that would not create congestion to the residence of Bowie.

What transportation issues are a priority?

Energy & Sustainability, Infrastructure of roads.

Leon Buck

What is your name, age and what district do you live in?

Leon Buck, 56, District 4

What office are you seeking?

I’m running to be the next Councilperson, District 4

What is your background? Please include education, work and prior public service.

I am a seasoned, 25-year Democratic Capitol Hill veteran. IN 2015, I founded Government Strategies, a government relations rm serving clients before Congress and federal agencies. Prior to that, I was Assistant Vice President for the Property Casualty Insurers Association, where I was the chief lobbyist for House Democrats specializing in Dodd-Frank issues; complex insurance matters such as the reauthorization of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), the Terrorism Risk Insurance Program (TRIA), and the ability of insurance companies to preserve and protect underwriting freedom before the House Financial Services and Senate Banking Committees. I have deep established ties with members of the Congressional Black Caucus, the Congressional Hispanic Caucus and senior members of the House Democratic leadership.

I also served as the Chief of Staff and legislative director for U.S. Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee (D-TX.), where I worked on issues such as the Violence Against Women Act, the USA Patriot Act, and Federal hate crimes legislation. I also served as a lobbyist for the American Red Cross, where I managed federal and state government relations and public policy throughout the Gulf Coast region for the Hurricane Recovery Program. Prior to that, I served as the minority staff director to the Subcommittee on Immigration and Border Security of the House Judiciary Committee, he specializing in legislation for high-tech immigrant visas, the U.S. visa waiver program and investment visas. I have also served as legislative director to D.C. Mayors Sharon Pratt Kelly and Marion Barry before the Council of the District of Columbia.

I have been a resident of Bowie, District 4, since 2003. It was then that I started coaching baseball and basketball for the South Bowie Boys and Girls Club. I served the South Bowie Boys and Girls Club (SBBGC) as both baseball commissioner and Athletic Director, while also serving on the SBBGC's Community Recreation Committee. In 2008, I was appointed to the City's Recreation Committee and I worked successfully to acquire much needed dollars both from the city of Bowie and the State of Maryland—working with Senator Douglas Peters—to build a concession stand at the Church Road football eld and worked successfully with Bowie City Councilman Todd Turner on adding much needed earmarks to the city's recreation budget.

In 2012, I founded the Bowie Elite Baseball Club, a 501(c)(3) organization located in Bowie, Maryland, that promotes youth baseball for players in the DC Metropolitan area. The organization comprises players from Prince Georges, Montgomery, Charles, and Calvert counties, in Maryland, and from the District of Columbia. Since its inception, the Club has served more than 500 young men and their families. The Bowie Elite Baseball Club plays its home games in Bowie, Maryland, and travels throughout Maryland and to tournaments throughout the mid-Atlantic region. The mission of the club is “through baseball, we have a positive impact on the lives of our area youth, their families, and the community.” I currently coach a Varsity-age high school team for Bowie Elite. I served as a valuable member on the Bowie Election Commission in 2008, where the body decided to recommend to change city council terms from two years to four years.

I am a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. and served the fraternity as President of a local Washington, DC, chapter, as well as serving as the Mid-Atlantic District Director for Washington, DC, Maryland and Delaware.

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I am a graduate of Colby College in Waterville, Maine where I received the Ralph J. Bunche Scholarship.

Please provide links to relevant social media pages and campaign websites:

What issues have you talked about the most on the campaign trail, and how would you address those concerns in office? Please list as many as you would like, and denote which is the most urgent in your view.

CHURCH ROAD

Church Road in Bowie has always been a hazardous street to navigate, with its winding S- curves with blind spots and only two lanes. Why is it that the lanes going toward 450 are widened and expanded, but those going toward 214 remain narrow? The people in District 4 should not have to settle for unsafe and ine cient roads. As your new City Councilman in District 4, I will ght to widen Church Road toward 214 and make it safer. Since this is a paramount safety issue, this will be high on my priority list.

CELL PHONES/TOWERS

Many District 4 residents are experiencing cell phone signal loss in their homes when driving around Routes 301 and 214. This is unacceptable. We need cell phone carriers to build more cell towers so that residents have consistent, reliable Wi-Fi to meet all of their technological needs. As your new City Councilman in District 4, I will work tirelessly to ensure that the carrier companies are responsive to our needs, and responsible and accountable in their actions.

SOUTHLAKE INFRASTRUCTURE

The Southlake Development will soon be breaking ground, and will consist of 1,360 dwelling units with many amenities. We need the infrastructure to support these residents. In order to avoid overcrowding of our schools, a new elementary school must be considered to accommodate the new residents in Southlake, and the surrounding roads must be assessed to ensure that they can accommodate the additional traffic. As your new City Councilman in District 4, I will ensure that infrastructure for Southlake is not an afterthought.

BASKETBALL COURTS/RECREATION

The City Council decided not to build additional basketball courts in the new Ice Arena. As a former basketball coach, I remember practicing in the overcrowded Bowie City Gymnasium. The discussion to build an additional gym has lasted for more than a decade. As your new City Councilman in District 4, I will advocate for immediate action on securing a central location for additional gym space.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Some businesses are leaving the city of Bowie. The Bowie Town Center has become a glaring example of slowed economic development. Bowie residents should not have to travel to Crofton or Annapolis to shop and eat. We need to be more proactive and business minded in order to attract and retain high-end restaurants and thriving retail. As your new City Councilman in District 4, I will work to spur economic development and to make Bowie a magnet for attracting a diverse selection of large and small, and minority- and women-owned businesses.

If elected, how would you approach development in Bowie? What would you do in office to influence, or not influence, growth in the area?

I think we need smart and prudent development in Bowie; but particularly in District 4. The new Southlake Development will bring District 4′s only grocery store, three hotels and 1300 new residents and a significant change in traffic patterns. New development should come with a solid infrastructure in place to support new residents. That means traffic safety free of increased congestion, playgrounds and schools to accommodate our new residents with children, and senior housing to accommodate our older residents with fixed incomes.

What transportation issues are a priority?

We have to fix Church Road immediately. Since this is a county road, the city council must work hand in hand with the the Prince Georges County Council to widen it immediately to eliminate its blind spots and dangerous hills. We also need to work with the State to begin widening Route 301. Why are these much needed improvements taking so long? I will be a tireless advocate to make sure these things are accomplished. To have your roads safe free from hazards is our absolute right as city residents who pay taxes.

Derrick Mallard

What is your name, age and what district do you live in?

My name is Derrick Mallard. I am 45 years of age and I live in District 4.

What office are you seeking?

I am seeking the Council seat in District 4.

What is your background? Please include education, work and prior public service.

I was born and raised in Washington, DC but have lived in Prince George’s County for over a decade. I chose to make Bowie my home, where I’m raising my 3 children.

I am a proud union bus operator and know rsthand how important it is to have City policies that protect working families and put the community rst. I am running for Bowie City Council District 4 in this upcoming election because I want to make sure that Bowie stays on a path towards responsible economic development, prioritizes community-focused public safety, and plans its transportation for the needs of the future. I hope I can count on your vote this November 5th!

What issues have you talked about the most on the campaign trail, and how would you address those concerns in office? Please list as many as you would like, and denote which is the most urgent in your view.

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This campaign is all about building community. That’s why as your Councilmember, I would continue to support existing programs that bring us together, like the city’s recreation programs, public art grants, teen mentoring programs, and senior services. I would also work to bring homeowners associations (HOAs) into a closer relationship with the city government, to make sure that their needs and concerns are heard.

We should work to ensure that everyone feels safe in their own neighborhoods. We should support the continuation of the city’s community policing efforts, where police are actively encouraged to be embedded and recognizable figures in their neighborhoods. Crime prevention is not just about policing. We should make sure that our schools and city services are providing the necessary counseling support that can help identify and deter criminal activity before it happens.

If elected, how would you approach development in Bowie? What would you do in office to influence, or not influence, growth in the area?

We can’t afford to base our economic growth plans on offering tax breaks to businesses that might leave the community in a couple of years. We should prioritize building a tax base where money stays in the community for as long as possible. We should also look to use the City’s empty retail space and lower rents as an asset. We should continue supporting the Bowie Business Innovation Center, which serves to incubate new businesses and help them grow.

What transportation issues are a priority?

As a bus operator, I know firsthand the importance of properly planning transportation systems. We shouldn’t just be looking at the transportation needs for this year, but what impact our decisions will have years from now. Good transportation systems can also be sparks for economic development. We should be doing our best to make planning decisions that will keep us on a path to sustainable growth and avoid future traffic jams and gridlock. Smart planning, combined with public transportation, can prevent future headaches caused by a growing city.

Roxy Ndebumadu

What is your name, age and what district do you live in?

Roxy Ndebumadu, 26, 4

What office are you seeking?

Bowie City Council, District 4

What is your background? Please include education, work and prior public service.

Education: Howard University - Health Sciences, B.S. Work: Microsoft, Federal Customer Success Lead Public Service: Red Cross, Brookings Institute, Young Ladies of Tomorrow, Grace Hopper, SOME, DigiGirlz, Black Girls Code, Women in Technology, The Women's Center, Campus Recruiting, and many more.

Bio - Surviving a tough childhood My childhood was not easy, but it made me who I am today.

I was born with a paralyzed left arm due to Erb’s palsy. My mother had immigrated here from Nigeria and was raising me on her own. As a young child, I was subjected to traumas, such as abuse, from people who were meant to care for me while my mother worked long hours to support us.

Growing up with no one to fight for me taught me to fight for myself.

Rising above to find myself

My teen years brought more trauma and difficulties. I went to work at age thirteen to support myself and help my mother with the bills. Some of my family members overseas were helpful and supportive, but others told me I wouldn’t amount to anything in life. At first, this destroyed my confidence. But deep down, I knew they were wrong.

Having no one to turn to taught me to rely on myself. Meeting challenges

I didn’t have money for college, so I worked full-time in between classes to pay for my education. At Howard University, I participated in one of the largest technology implementations to date across the Health Division, to enable continued learning for students in the university's health schools. That’s when I learned how to combine the power of technology and sheer hard work to solve problems and enhance people’s lives.

Encountering challenges taught me continuous optimism. Working hard to better myself and those around me

I’ve always been curious about the metrics of success: how companies survive and thrive, while doing good on a global level. This curiosity fed my interest in innovation and led me to pursue a certi cate in Strategy & Performance Management after graduation. It also led me to Microsoft. Having the opportunity to participate in company-supported programs that work with small businesses and large corporations in Latin America and Africa to provide advice on improving e ciency, enhancing consumer experiences, and cutting organizational costs is one of the reasons why I joined Microsoft.

Studying success and policy taught me how to help others be successful.

A new voice, with a new vision, ready to lead

Today, I manage a team of technical advisors at Microsoft and I am enrolled in the executive leadership program at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. As a member of the First Baptist Church of Glenarden, I’ve given my time, talent, and funds to support volunteer organizations and contribute give back to the community and the world.

My story has made me who I am today.

Surviving abuse inspired me to help fundraise for the Women's Center, an organization that provides abuse survivors and families with scaled counseling, education, support, and advocacy services along with leadership and career mentoring. My passion for world issues steered me to become co-chair of the Robert S. Brookings Society, Washington, D.C. chapter at the Brookings Institution, a think tank that engages thought leaders in conversation around policy and changemaking, where I recently helped lead discussions on technology access and the urban and rural divide. Serving as a mentor for Women in Technology, a program that promotes technology careers, highlights rising stars, and emphasizes STEM education, showed me how we can use technology to open up possibilities and opportunities for the next generation.

Some people told me I was young to consider political o ce. But I’ve lived through plenty of tough experiences in my life, and they gave me the courage to survive, transcend, and grow. That’s what I bring to my hometown of Bowie, as a city council candidate.

Please provide links to relevant social media pages and campaign websites: www.roxyforbowie.com, FB: Roxy for Bowie

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What issues have you talked about the most on the campaign trail, and how would you address those concerns in office? Please list as many as you would like, and denote which is the most urgent in your view.

She intends to focus on four major areas to revitalize Bowie. “Economic development, public safety, senior citizens, and the municipal budget are the keys to any community. We need to streamline our process for new businesses to come into Bowie and offer incentives based on businesses staying in Bowie. For public safety, we need to partner with our police and re departments to support our citizens with a pilot program for subsidized Ring video doorbells. Our seniors are the backbone of our community, we want them to maintain independence. Mixed use senior housing combined with businesses that cater to them, will help the seniors and spur economic development. The municipal budget is being used as a tool for votes. Instead of responsible budgeting, rainy day funds are used to avoid tax increases. Soon, there will be no safety net for our community.” Ndebumadu stated. Ndebumadu also stresses the importance of STEM Youth Programs to expose our children to technology quicker.

If elected, how would you approach development in Bowie? What would you do in office to influence, or not influence, growth in the area?

We need to see the storefronts and buildings that are currently vacant as assets and market them as such. Larger corporations, such as grocery stores, need incentives to move into Bowie but tie them into longevity so they need to stay or pay back any incentive. Code enforcement will stop blight in our community, allowing the city to move faster to correct problems and making Bowie more attractive to businesses. Small businesses also need our support. We must streamline the permit process, so we can make it easier for small enterprise like restaurants and family businesses to start up in Bowie.

What transportation issues are a priority?

We need to explore lane expansion to alleviate traffic congestion but only in conjunction with a comprehensive plan evaluation that does not allow random expansion. We need traffic solutions that are long term not just temporary.

At-Large Candidates

Ingrid Scott Harrison

What is your name, age and what district do you live in?

Ingrid Scott Harrison, 52, District 3

What office are you seeking? Bowie City Council At-Large

What is your background? Please include education, work and prior public service.

As a resident of Bowie and a Prince George’s County resident for over 24 years, I have a significant history of professional experience in serving the citizens of Bowie and Prince George’s County and would be honored to serve as one of the At-Large members on the Bowie City Council.

I have a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communications from Saint Augustine’s University and a Master of Arts degree in Management from University of Phoenix. I am also a graduate of Leadership Prince George’s and have a certificate from the Washington Business Journals Executive Leadership Training class.

I currently work as the Community and Outreach Department Manager for Employ Prince George’s (EPG) the workforce development organization and the home of the American Job Center for Prince George’s County. In this capacity, I am responsible for leading EPG’s expansion through effective outreach, partnership development and development of innovative workforce development programs, practices and strategies.

For almost a decade, as the Community Outreach Coordinator in the Prince George’s County Council District 4 office, I coordinated and implemented annual events for the residents of Bowie such as the Bowie Senior Picnic, town hall meetings, and youth events at Bowie High School. Most importantly, through my work, I connected with many Bowie residents, including our senior citizens. I was able to assist residents by building relationships with the Bowie Police and Fire Departments, the Bowie High School principal, several Bowie-based churches and many Bowie-based nonprofits.

My service to the community included serving as the 11th President of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., Iota Gamma Omega Chapter from 2010-2013. Additionally. I served a dual role as President of its philanthropic arm, The Ivy Community Charities of Prince George’s County, Inc. These positions afforded me the opportunity to motivate and encourage over 500 women to expand our efforts in service to the community. In these roles, I managed two large budgets and was instrumental in the purchase of our Ivy Youth and Family Center property located in Suitland, MD. This experience inspired me to run for public office so I could work directly for and make a difference in the lives of our residents. In June 2018, I was honored to be elected by the citizens of Legislative District 23B to serve on the Prince George’s County Democratic Central Committee. After I was sworn in, I was elected by my peers to serve on the Executive Board as Secretary and was I was appointed to serve as co-chair of its Legislative Committee. In this role, I am responsible for working with our state and county legislators to influence legislation pertinent to the residents and its impact on them. In 2017, I was appointed by the Prince George’s County Council to serve as the Council Representative on the Executive Board for the Liberty Sports Park where I currently serve as the Board Secretary. In this capacity, I am in a position to add great value to the Bowie City Council by ensuring the Board understands and works to address any concerns the residents of Bowie may have with this project. I am most proud to be a mother to my son Alexander, 23, and my daughter Christina, 18.

Please provide links to relevant social media pages and campaign websites:

What issues have you talked about the most on the campaign trail, and how would you address those concerns in office? Please list as many as you would like, and denote which is the most urgent in your view.

The issues I have talked about the most on the campaign trail include: development, tra c, taxes, code enforcement, Bowie Town Center store retention and community involvement. In regard to the top two concerns (most urgent), development and traffic, the first priority for the City is to work on strengthening our infrastructure prior to bringing in new development projects. This includes working with the state to obtain the funding to widen Route 197. Also, I am against development of the Sacred Heart Property at Route 450 and 301 and the current proposed apartment complex at the Market Place. We must consider the impact of future development on city services, public safety, schools, the environment, property values, roads, traffic abatement (stop signs, speed humps) and pedestrian safety.

The next concern talked about was the fear that taxes would be raised. Residents have expressed their belief that taxes in Bowie are much higher than other jurisdictions and have stated they could not afford a tax increase. While the City of Bowie has not increased taxes over the last 10 years based on efficient fiscal management, services continue to grow more expensive. I believe that as a city, we need to explore increased tax differentials for duplicate county services.

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Code enforcement must be a significant priority for the city. Home values are directly impacted by nearby homes that are not maintained, therefore we need to hire more code enforcement staff. My next concern is retention of businesses in the Bowie Town Center. My plan will be to meet with property owners to find out the cause of the moves and work with them on conquering the challenge of the erosion of our tax base.

The last issue I have talked about is increasing citizen involvement in issues facing the city. It is critical that residents are aware and understand what the Council is discussing and voting on, whether they agree or not. It is very important they be heard, and not only at the Council meetings, but within their respective communities. I believe that citizen involvement should come while the issue is initial discussed and not when a matter has already been decided by the Council.

My plan to address all of these concerns, if I am elected to the Council, would be to work with the city manager, city agencies, city committees, community leaders and residents to develop a plan for smarter growth. As a councilmember, I would host town hall meetings and/or listening sessions in each district to hear from the residents and work together to do what is in the best interest of the City. I also believe the Council should host annual planning retreats to hear from all agency leaders as they outline their prospective plans, budget requests and insight into the needs of the City. The goal is to bring ALL stakeholders together to make informed decisions.

If elected, how would you approach development in Bowie? What would you do in office to influence, or not influence, growth in the area?

If elected, I would approach development in Bowie by working to strengthen our infrastructure prior to bringing in new development projects. I plan to work with the council to first, consider the impact economic growth has on our city services, public safety, the environment, roads, schools, and property values.

In regard to influencing or not influencing growth, my plan is to speak with the residents to hear their opinions on how any proposed development projects would affect them. I would also speak with our city and county officials to determine their rationale for any new projects and how it will impact the city overall. One of the most important issues facing the city at this time is erosion of our business tax base. This, if not dealt with, will eventually lead to the need to increase taxes to maintain a quality level of services for City residents.

What transportation issues are a priority?

The transportation issues that are a priority for the city include speeding, traffic congestion, widening of 197 and 301, adding bike lanes to major roads, and repairing sidewalks. We also need to lobby the state to restore to 100% the Highway User Review Funds and revisit the funding formula to increase the city’s share of the gas tax. Our leaders must be proactive in their decision-making instead of reactive when it comes to transportation concerns.

In speaking with several long-time Bowie residents, their main concerns are the increase in traffic and the speeding cars through their neighborhoods. They expressed with new development projects such as Melford, South Lake and the Freeway Airport, the problem will only get worse. These concerns were heightened after the tragic death of a teenager on Church Road in June. To that end, I have spoken with our state representatives who shared they have drafted a bill to have a speed camera placed on Church Road to slow drivers down.

The increase in traffic through Bowie causes major backups on our main roads, such as 197 and 301. The state has placed the widening of 197 on its list of priorities and the widening of 301 is expected to happen with the development of South Lake. I plan to work with our state representatives and hold them accountable to ensure these projects happen.

We should also consider adding bike lanes to our roads to help lessen the impact motor vehicles have on our environment. Consideration of green options is critical. Additionally, some of our sidewalks are in desperate need of repair. Many are cracked and tree roots have come up through the cement. I will work with the city to have these sidewalks repaired, as it has become a safety issue.

Dustin Kuzan

What is your name, age and what district do you live in?

Dustin Kuzan, 33, D2

What office are you seeking?

City Council At-Large

What is your background? Please include education, work and prior public service.

I’m a licensed Civil Engineer in the State of Maryland and Virginia in the eld of transportation and a focus on active and/or alternative transportation. I worked for the Maryland State Highway Administration (SHA) for 8 years and have consulted in transportation and community planning for the past 4 years. I have a Master’s in Public Administration, which is the study of the government bureaucracy. I have spent the majority of my career, in both my professional life and volunteer life in public service, advocating and working toward improving government functions to enhance the services of government and improve the quality of life for citizens that bene t from them. While at SHA, I led the statewide bicycle and pedestrian program and was responsible for oversight on capital programs that implemented sidewalks, trails and bike lanes, as well as, responsible for establishing and guiding the agency in goal setting and policy development in that area. While there I lead the development of a statewide Pedestrian Safety Program, the establishment of a statewide strategic pedestrian safety plan, and the creation of a statewide Complete Streets policy, in addition to assisting in several other critical policies for change. I’ve spent the last 4 years in private sector consulting, however, have increased my role in government services outside of work. Even after leaving the state I’ve taken on a leadership role as a Strategy lead under the Statewide Strategic Highway Safety Plan (SHSP) to focus on advancing the skills and knowledge of the transportation profession, as well as, coordination of statewide efforts to help advance the passage of state legislation in that area. As a result of the Marketplace development, which is directly across from my community, yet I can not legally or accessibly (by ADA standards) walk to, I’ve created a group in the City that is focused on advancing better policy and projects in the City of Bowie for walking and bicycling. This group is known as the Multi-modal Access and Public Spaces (MAPS) citizen advisory group to the City Council. It has successfully lobbied for funding for the 2019 Bowie Trails Master Plan, and has drafted the City of Bowie Complete Streets Policy, which will be adopted on September 3rd. It has also been influential in raising awareness and promoting projects for the City to focus on to advance this goal, including the Heritage Trail project. On of my most recent, and most exciting City involvement efforts has been the formation of a team that is focused on revitalizing Old Bowie through the Arts & Music. Along with other key team members I’ve been able to form a group that meets regular and works toward putting in place key components that will allow Old Bowie to develop into a regional Arts & Entertainment District that can serve as an area of artists to grow their skills, a location for residents to relax in a unique environment, and a place that could potentially give hope for the greater good to the region, or the country, through the demonstration of positive art and music.

Please provide links to relevant social media pages and campaign websites:

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What issues have you talked about the most on the campaign trail, and how would you address those concerns in office? Please list as many as you would like, and denote which is the most urgent in your view.

Development and its negative effect on the quality of life is probably the most prevalent topic of conversation.This is asked in the next question, so I’ll save my solution on it for that. The next most frequently discussed issue is probably transportation, followed by sustainability and the environment, and then general corruption in our political process locally and nationally. I’ve also have had some conversations about increasing taxes and/or spending levels compared to revenues (with the Ice Arena always an example), and rare conversations about trash pick, 5G wifi, fluoride in our drinking water and our growing police department and the pension system. Setting development aside, I think one of the most important issues to tackle over the next 4 years will be sustainability of our community in the sense of being able to be mobile (traffic congestion), bringing in adequate revenue to support city services, protect the dwindling environment that is important to our health and well-being, and ensuring the general quality of life in Bowie remains high and does not begin to decline due to the city’s decreasing fiscal health. This is not just one issue that we deal with, but its an interconnected series of issues that we must have hard and sincere discussions about as a Council over the next 4 years. We must begin to look at our revenue generators, our City services, our recreational amenities that enhance the quality of life, our aging infrastructure, our overpopulated roads and schools, our overburdened police force, our environment and our overall quality of life as one big picture that all relates to, and effects one another. We need to move away from handling issues in piecemeal, and begin to have a broader, yet more in-depth understanding of how the city generates revenue and how it pays for its services. We need to recognize that development is not the only solution, simply because it increases the tax base. Development also places a burden on our roads, our schools, our police force, and our environment, all of which are detrimental to the quality of life of our residents. My biggest focus will be learning to understand how all of these aspects interact, and strongly engaging residents to understand their priorities in what makes this community so attractive to them. We need to grow this city smart and sustainability and we need to move away from making decisions in a bubble. The city needs to engage the community more to understand their needs better, and then it needs to take a more proactive approach (not reactive) approach to growth to ensure that we can retain the services and accommodations our residents want to see, and that our community is fiscally, culturally and environmentally sustainable for decades to come.

If elected, how would you approach development in Bowie? What would you do in office to influence, or not influence, growth in the area?

I believe our City Council needs to encourage growth that is desirable by our current resident. We need to move away from the notice that any development is good development because it increases our tax base. As a city we don’t currently understand what it is that we want to grow to, therefore, we don’t fully understand what sort of tax base we need. We also could explore other areas of generating revenue for the city rather than focus solely on increasing the number of tax paying residents. I believe we need to move away from this idea that development is good and recognize that it is impacting the existing quality of life for our residents. We need to ensure that, as a Council, we are not making it easy for developers to clear land, erect buildings, increase the burden on our surrounding area and walk away. We need to make sure they are contributing their fair share, and sometimes this fair share may unfortunately mean they are contributing more to x the roads, schools, public safety and the environment to help x the damages of previous developers that were allowed to take short cuts. If a developer can’t make a pro t, then the city doesn’t need their revenue, we should be able to find other ways to pay for our own services. Its not sustainable if we need to keep growing to keep paying for past growth. I would like to be harder on developers in several ways: 1) never give developers money out of tax payer pockets to help them build - like we did with south lake when we gave them $10 M to build roads to redevelop a forest area. If they can’t make it pro table without tax payer money, then we don’t need them. Tax payers shouldn’t have to take money out of their own pockets to help a developer pro t. 2) we should not accept just “mitigation” for their own transportation impacts, but require them to contribute to enhancing the overall transportation system. I don’t care if its not “fair”. The reason we are in the situation we are in now is because past developers got away with cutting corners. The way I see it now is that developers today now need to pay for the shortcuts of past developers. It should fall on the developers to do this, not the tax payers. 3) We need to require developers to enhance (not just mitigate) the environment around their site. We require them to enhance transportation infrastructure and pay a surplus fee for schools and public safety, we need to do the same for the environment. On an extreme case, we’ve seen what the impacts of development does to our existing communities and culture in Ellicott City. Upstream development, which is pro ting, has lead to massive flooding downstream, which causes small businesses and tax payers millions to repair damages due to the flooding. This is happening to farmers downstream as well. Water runoff is only one aspect of the interconnected environment which is being damaged. We need to make sure developers are pulling their weight in these areas. 4) we need to have conversations early and often with the public about the types of developments and the business going into them and actively work to encourage vibrant development that our community wants to see. We can not continue to say “well they’ll do a great job because they know what they are doing”. They are simply looking for the most pro table business to install. Just as in any government role, we need to incentive them to be more creative and challenge them to take more risk in order to provide development that is more desirable for existing residents.

What transportation issues are a priority?

Transportation is the backbone to the economy and to our quality of life. No transportation would mean we would all be isolated to our own homes and couldn’t move around to work, to the store, or for entertainment, all of which are important areas of our lives. I would like to focus on unique approaches to transportation by looking at it differently than our city has in the past. We can do this in two ways: 1) approach vehicular transportation projects through small incremental progress, rather than wishful large scale singular projects 2) focus on more than just vehicle transportation as a means to allow people to move within their community, and focus on walking, bicycling and transit. For vehicular transportation, you can look at it as two areas: a. system preservation (maintenance and operations) and 2) system expansion. Historically, when money was good at the federal and state level, politicians would focus on “sexy” system expansion projects (aka new roadways, complete reconstruction of roadways, etc.). System preservation was always an after thought because it didn’t involve a ribbon cutting and didn’t allow for politicians to put their name on a new road. Times have changed though, and we need to change with them. Today money is limited at the state and federal level and municipalities typically only program money for system preservation as they rely on county and state nances to construct system expansion projects. We need to move away from the traditional approach of placing all of our city transportation resources into maintenance of existing facilities and relying on others for expansion. We can do small scale expansions and work with the county and the state to make this happen. All the years working at SHA and now consulting for them I see areas such as Montgomery County, MD contribute nancial resources to SHA to help advance projects and it works to build small scale enhancements, such as intersection improvements, enhanced crosswalks, and roadway re-purposing projects. These on things that Bowie needs to do more of to enhance local transportation. We need to focus on partnering with the County and the State to enhance intersections so people can make left turns out of their developments. We need to focus on installing signals, partial signals, or active warning beacons at intersections on roadways such as Church Road, to provide better protections to kids crossing the road. We need to look at low-lying improvements that can help relieve congestion without relying on multi-million dollar projects to be funded through the annual Priority Letter process such as we’ve been doing for the past decade with MD 197 and MD 450, which have yet to be funded for construction, and will not be in the near future. We need to make incremental advancements in our transportation network through partnerships with county and state departments on strategic projects. These strategic projects can be developed on corridors such as MD 301, Church Road, MD 450 and MD 197 where we see most of the traffic problems today. We also need to take this same tactic with getting a partial interchange from US 50 to the Melford development. We might be able to get developer support in this project. The key to this approach, however, is lobbying our partner agencies to take action and not laying off of them until they do. This is why Montgomery County is so successful in seeing improvements in their transportation system, but we are not. Beyond this incremental approach, we need to think beyond vehicular transportation and begin laying the foundation to move people locally and regionally through other forms of transportation. Locally, people should be able to walk or bike to their nearby shopping centers without fear of being hit by a car. This enhanced sense of freedom lowers stress and increases livability. Regionally, we need to focus on enhanced transit to and from regional job centers such as DC, Annapolis, Baltimore, New Carrolton, College Park and Bethesda. We need to begin putting long range plans in place that will allow a transit system to run from New Carrolton to Annapolis with at least 2 stops in Bowie where our current Park and Ride system is and where our largest mixed used area. This train be an extension of the new purple line system and connect us to many of the large employment centers in Montgomery County. It would allow our residents to get to/from these areas without the stress of sitting in beltway traffic. We need to focus on the 2019 Bowie Area Master Plan Update to ensure this train facility is captured in the plan.

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Henri Gardner

What is your name, age and what district do you live in?

Henri Gardner, Date of Birth July 4, 1969 and I resident in the Essington Community of the City of Bowie’s District 3.

What office are you seeking?

As a candidate in the city wide elections, I am seeking re-election as an At - Large member of the City of Bowie Council. Voters will have a choice of 2 candidates, I am hopeful to be 1 of their choices.

What is your background? Please include education, work and prior public service.

Born in Philadelphia, PA but raised in Norfolk, VA., I served as a Reservists in both the US Airforce, as a Crew Chief on the C-5 Galaxy assigned to Dover ABF, and the US Army as a Combat Medic with duty assignments throughout the US and abroad. Being a member of the US Armed Forces, I was able to benefit from the GI Bill which afforded me the opportunity to attend and graduate from Old Dominion University of Norfolk ,VA with a BA in Political Science. While in college, I participated in several political clubs and supported candidates for elected office. As an active member of my family church, New Hope Church of God in Christ of Norfolk, VA, I learned the importance of community involvement. There at New Hope COGIC, I worked to clean-up drug infested playgrounds, organized a community food bank, and worked as a volunteer driver to transport senior residents to medical appointments. As a former 10 year resident of Washington, DC., I saw first hand many of the problems which plague that community. I became actively involved in the community through an organization known as Anacostia Community Outreach Center, ACOC. There at ACOC, I assisted in several activities ranging from Winter Coat Drives, to Thanksgiving Dinner preparation for residents, and later as a volunteer GED Instructor. Side note...., a couple of my GED students entered Bowie State and Virginia Commonwealth Univeristy as full time students.

Please provide links to relevant social media pages and campaign websites:

Should you wish to communicate with my campaign or contact me via social media, I may be found on Facebook and the campaign web address is www.HENRIGARDNER.com

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What issues have you talked about the most on the campaign trail, and how would you address those concerns in office? Please list as many as you would like, and denote which is the most urgent in your view.

As I walk communities, knock on doors, and speak with Bowie residents..., I hear a number of concerns ranging from water, to ball fields, to traffic, and lastly development. As I speak with Bowie residents, many say they are pleased with the current state of the city and its direction. Residents have also said that they are sorry to learn that Mayor Robinson is not seeking another term. If re-elected, I will continue to relay on the residents of Bowie to provide insight as to how they wish I vote on a particular matters. Previously, I hosted community meetings where residents were able to voice opposition to projects. Also, by request I have visited Bowie residents in their homes for group or individual discussions. Conversations with Bowie residents have a direct impact on how I vote on matters and projects which have a direct impact on our community. I was elected by the people, and I’ve been a voice for the people of Bowie. As a member of the Bowie City Council, I have never supported a project of which the community was firmly against...... for example the Apartments at Market Place, All Development on Church Road, Elm Street Development," on Route 450 of 440 homes, and Apartments a Hiltop Shopping Center . If re-elected I will continue to be a voice for the residents of Bowie and we must urgently work to attract development projects which consider the Bowie resident and work to reduce the number of vehicles on the roads of our community.

If elected, how would you approach development in Bowie? What would you do in office to influence, or not influence, growth in the area?

If re-elected it is important that the Council takes a strong look at all pending projects which are in the Development pipeline. The council must proceed with caution prior to approving projects. It is important not to over saturate the Bowie market with housing. Each project must be carefully studied prior to its approval. Previously, and if re-elected I will continue to encourage residents and supporters to come voice their opposition to projects during council hearings in hopes of influencing my colleagues on the council.

What transportation issues are a priority?

As the At Large Council member, and current Mayor Pro Tem for the City of Bowie, I have engaged in multiple conversations with residents who have strongly voiced their concerns of increased speeding and reckless driving through-out the City of Bowie. Because of the threat of a possible injury of fatality, I worked with the residents of Twisting Lane to have speed calming humps installed on their street. Also, residents have asked for the addition of Metro Buses during both the morning and evening rush hours for a easier commute to New Carlton’s Metro Station, and have asked for additional Police presence at the Bowie Metro Kiss & Ride where many residents park their vehicles as they commute to and from work. As part of my evaluation for development projects, I look for those which work to reduce the number of cars on our roads, ..... example Projects which have both a residential and retail components.

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