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Harnessing magic mushrooms to treat depression | PHOTOS

Graduate student Tony Cole sciles brain material extracted from a C57 subject, using a vibratome after a study in mice at the University of Maryland School of Medicine revealed that a promising psychedelic drug psilocybin (a component in 200 species of fungus known as 'magic mushrooms') could maybe treat depression without the psychedelic trip, which could cut time and cost of the drug's use Wed., May 12, 2021. (Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun Staff)
(Karl Merton Ferron/The Baltimore Sun)
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A study of mice at University of Maryland School of Medicine revealed that a promising psychedelic drug psilocybin (a component in 200 species of fungus known as 'magic mushrooms') could maybe treat depression without the psychedelic trip, which could cut time and cost of the drug's use
(Karl Merton Ferron)
Using magic mushrooms to harness depression
Dr. Scott Thompson speaks after a study at University of Maryland School of Medicine revealed that a promising psychedelic drug psilocybin (a component in 200 species of fungus known as 'magic mushrooms') could maybe treat depression without the psychedelic trip, which could cut time and cost of the drug's use Wed., May 12, 2021. (Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun Staff)
Dr. Scott Thompson speaks after a study at University of Maryland School of Medicine revealed that a promising psychedelic drug psilocybin (a component in 200 species of fungus known as 'magic mushrooms') could maybe treat depression without the psychedelic trip, which could cut time and cost of the drug's use Wed., May 12, 2021. (Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun Staff) (Karl Merton Ferron/The Baltimore Sun)
Using magic mushrooms to harness depression
Graduate student Tony Cole slices brain material extracted from a C57 subject, using a vibratome after a study in mice at University of Maryland School of Medicine revealed that a promising psychedelic drug psilocybin (a component in 200 species of fungus known as 'magic mushrooms') could maybe treat depression without the psychedelic trip, which could cut time and cost of the drug's use Wed., May 12, 2021. (Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun Staff)
Graduate student Tony Cole slices brain material extracted from a C57 subject, using a vibratome after a study in mice at University of Maryland School of Medicine revealed that a promising psychedelic drug psilocybin (a component in 200 species of fungus known as 'magic mushrooms') could maybe treat depression without the psychedelic trip, which could cut time and cost of the drug's use Wed., May 12, 2021. (Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun Staff) (Karl Merton Ferron/The Baltimore Sun)
Using magic mushrooms to harness depression
Graduate student Andreas Wulff examines results on a laptop as work continues after a study at University of Maryland School of Medicine revealed that a promising psychedelic drug psilocybin (a component in 200 species of fungus known as 'magic mushrooms') could maybe treat depression without the psychedelic trip, which could cut time and cost of the drug's use Wed., May 12, 2021. (Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun Staff)
Graduate student Andreas Wulff examines results on a laptop as work continues after a study at University of Maryland School of Medicine revealed that a promising psychedelic drug psilocybin (a component in 200 species of fungus known as 'magic mushrooms') could maybe treat depression without the psychedelic trip, which could cut time and cost of the drug's use Wed., May 12, 2021. (Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun Staff) (Karl Merton Ferron/The Baltimore Sun)
Using magic mushrooms to harness depression
Graduate student Andreas Wulff (left) and Dr. Scott Thompson enter the lab to speak with graduate student Tim Troppoli who opens the refrigerator after a study at the University of Maryland School of Medicine revealed that a promising psychedelic drug psilocybin (a component in 200 species of fungus known as 'magic mushrooms') could maybe treat depression without the psychedelic trip, which could cut time and cost of the drug's use Wed., May 12, 2021. (Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun Staff)
Graduate student Andreas Wulff (left) and Dr. Scott Thompson enter the lab to speak with graduate student Tim Troppoli who opens the refrigerator after a study at the University of Maryland School of Medicine revealed that a promising psychedelic drug psilocybin (a component in 200 species of fungus known as 'magic mushrooms') could maybe treat depression without the psychedelic trip, which could cut time and cost of the drug's use Wed., May 12, 2021. (Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun Staff) (Karl Merton Ferron/The Baltimore Sun)
Using magic mushrooms to harness depression
Dr. Scott Thompson holds one of the C57 mice after a study at the University of Maryland School of Medicine revealed that a promising psychedelic drug psilocybin (a component in 200 species of fungus known as 'magic mushrooms') could maybe treat depression without the psychedelic trip, which could cut time and cost of the drug's use Wed., May 12, 2021. (Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun Staff)
Dr. Scott Thompson holds one of the C57 mice after a study at the University of Maryland School of Medicine revealed that a promising psychedelic drug psilocybin (a component in 200 species of fungus known as 'magic mushrooms') could maybe treat depression without the psychedelic trip, which could cut time and cost of the drug's use Wed., May 12, 2021. (Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun Staff) (Karl Merton Ferron/The Baltimore Sun)
Using magic mushrooms to harness depression
Graduate student Tony Cole sciles brain material extracted from a C57 subject, using a vibratome after a study in mice at the University of Maryland School of Medicine revealed that a promising psychedelic drug psilocybin (a component in 200 species of fungus known as 'magic mushrooms') could maybe treat depression without the psychedelic trip, which could cut time and cost of the drug's use Wed., May 12, 2021. (Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun Staff)
Graduate student Tony Cole sciles brain material extracted from a C57 subject, using a vibratome after a study in mice at the University of Maryland School of Medicine revealed that a promising psychedelic drug psilocybin (a component in 200 species of fungus known as 'magic mushrooms') could maybe treat depression without the psychedelic trip, which could cut time and cost of the drug's use Wed., May 12, 2021. (Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun Staff) (Karl Merton Ferron/The Baltimore Sun)
Using magic mushrooms to harness depression
Dr. Scott Thompson (second from left) stands between graduate students Andreas Wulff (left), Tim Troppoli and Tony Cole who continue their work after a study at the University of Maryland School of Medicine revealed that a promising psychedelic drug psilocybin (a component in 200 species of fungus known as 'magic mushrooms') could maybe treat depression without the psychedelic trip, which could cut time and cost of the drug's use Wed., May 12, 2021. (Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun Staff)
Dr. Scott Thompson (second from left) stands between graduate students Andreas Wulff (left), Tim Troppoli and Tony Cole who continue their work after a study at the University of Maryland School of Medicine revealed that a promising psychedelic drug psilocybin (a component in 200 species of fungus known as 'magic mushrooms') could maybe treat depression without the psychedelic trip, which could cut time and cost of the drug's use Wed., May 12, 2021. (Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun Staff) (Karl Merton Ferron/The Baltimore Sun)
Using magic mushrooms to harness depression
Two C57 mice rest together after a study at the University of Maryland School of Medicine revealed that a promising psychedelic drug psilocybin (a component in 200 species of fungus known as 'magic mushrooms') could maybe treat depression without the psychedelic trip, which could cut time and cost of the drug's use Wed., May 12, 2021. (Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun Staff)
Two C57 mice rest together after a study at the University of Maryland School of Medicine revealed that a promising psychedelic drug psilocybin (a component in 200 species of fungus known as 'magic mushrooms') could maybe treat depression without the psychedelic trip, which could cut time and cost of the drug's use Wed., May 12, 2021. (Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun Staff) (Karl Merton Ferron/The Baltimore Sun)
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