September 16, 2019 icon depicting Cloudy weather 75°F

Health Beat

Advertisement
Are you an ‘extreme early bird’?

Early to bed and early to rise? In its extreme form, this tendency is more common than previously believed, according to a new study.

Lots of gluten during toddler years might raise odds for celiac disease

Too much white bread and pasta fed to at-risk kids under age 5 could increase their odds of developing celiac disease, a new international study has concluded.

Plant-based diet leads to fewer heart problems

Future research on plant-based diets should examine whether the quality of plant foods — healthy versus less healthy — affects heart disease and death risks, experts say.

Students, bored by cafeteria fare, love food delivery services; schools don’t.

Students in middle and high schools across America thought they had found a way around cafeteria “cuisine” and boring brown-bag lunches: just hit up delivery services and get takeout food sent to their schools. Now, citing security and nuisance concerns, school districts from California to Delaware are cracking down.

Americans are sitting more than ever, increasing the risk for at least 10 major health issues

The United States has grown a bumper crop of couch potatoes in recent years, a new study reports.

Having a paying job may help fend off Alzheimer’s disease in women

A new study has shed light on a possible risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease in women: not having a job.

5 things you should know about heat exhaustion

Dr. Trevor Lewis shares tips for avoiding heat exhaustion. Hint: Staying ahead of the curve is key.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Doctors say summer is kidney-stone season. Here’s what you should know.

But researchers predict that rising temperatures will mean higher numbers of kidney stone patients.

Slow down the calorie counting: Personalized diets could be the future of healthy eating, study suggests

A recent twin study hints that one-size-fits-all diets might be doomed to fail. Call it incompatibility.

Obesity now associated with at least 13 types of cancer

Smoking has been the No. 1 preventable cause of cancer for decades, but obesity is poised to take the top spot.

Supplemental steroids, testosterone may lower men's sperm counts

Men who abuse hormones such as testosterone or steroids for bodybuilding can have declines in sperm and testosterone production, researchers say.

Fast food delivers even more calories than decades ago

Fast food fans today are ordering off menus that have grown more apt to make them fat.

Listening to music can 'significantly impair' creativity, study says

Do you listen to music while working? It could be affecting your creativity, according to a new report.

Weekend 'catch-up sleep' is a lie

The negative health effects of skimping on sleep during the week can't be reversed by marathon weekend sleep sessions.

Advertisement
Advertisement
When it comes to breathing during exercise, you're probably doing it wrong

Experts are learning that breathing through the mouth may not be as efficient or effective as breathing through the nose.

Beer before wine, always fine? Not according to hungover study participants.

In drinking lore, it’s said that having beer before wine, instead of the other way around, can help prevent a hangover. Well, it’s not true, a new study finds.

More evidence that abuse of Xanax, Valium is on the rise

About one in every five people who take Valium, Xanax and other benzodiazepines are misusing the potentially addictive medication, U.S. survey data show.

Experts see wearable technology, group fitness and HIIT leading 2019 fitness trends

A look at the biggest health and fitness trends of 2019, as predicted by industry insiders.

Wearing contacts 24/7 can have major consequences

Dangerous infections, blinding ulcers in the eyes: These are just some of the troubles that can come from wearing your contacts for too long.

Don't think of it as a New Year's resolution. Think of it as a new skill.

A more helpful approach to creating more healthful habits is to consider those behaviors new skills.

The CDC keeps warning people not to eat raw cookie dough — even though it's delicious

Christmas cookies are in the oven; mixing bowl, which is still coated with sugary sweet dough, is calling your name. Don't listen to it, health experts warn.

Advertisement