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MedStar Union Memorial fails preliminary accreditation due to problems with its inpatient dialysis center

Johns Hopkins nurse has filed a lawsuit against a doctor he said sprayed him with body fluid from a patient while he was assisting with a surgery. Benjamin Waldbaum said he was traumatized when Dr. Martin Slodzinski unscrewed the syringe from the patient’s IV and sprayed the fluid, which landed on his face and part of his torso.

MedStar Union Memorial Hospital was denied preliminary accreditation by the Joint Commission because of problems with its inpatient dialysis center that posed safety problems for patients.

A spokeswoman for the Joint Commission said in an email that a May 18 survey of the hospital, located on East University Parkway, found a condition that “posed a threat to patients or other individuals served.”

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Officials with MedStar said in a statement that they are working with the Joint Commission to resolve any problems with the unit.

“We take our responsibility to provide exceptional patient care very seriously,” the statement said. “After reviewing the survey results with appropriate medical, nursing and administrative staff, we immediately implemented a corrective action plan that has been accepted by The Joint Commission. We will continue to work with The Joint Commission to ensure all issues are resolved.”

MedStar Union Memorial was given 45 days from the initial survey to appeal the decision before a full denial is made. According to the Joint Commission’s website, the last on-site survey was June 8.

Accreditation by the Joint Commission is voluntary and allows hospitals like MedStar Union Memorial to receive Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement.

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