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Hopkins, University of Maryland medical students to get residency assignments at 'Match Day' ceremonies

Taking a look at Match Day 2017 at the Johns Hopkins and University of Maryland Schools of Medicine, an annual event where medical school graduates learn where they will do their residencies. (Kim Hairston, Barbara Haddock Taylor / Baltimore Sun)

Medical students at Johns Hopkins, the University of Maryland, and medical schools across the country, will find out today where they will do their residency programs.

The students will receive letters with the much anticipated information at noon during ceremonies on what is known as Match Day. The University of Maryland Medical School ceremony will be held at the Hippodrome Theater, where 142 students are expected to get their match letters, while 120 students from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine will be matched during an event at an atrium on the East Baltimore campus.

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University of Maryland students will be called on stage in random order to get their letters; Johns Hopkins students will open their letters all at once.

Hundreds of students who have just about finished their medical degrees at Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland will join with thousands around the county to learn where they will transform into practicing doctors during their three- to seven-year residencies.

The annual Match Day, now in its 65th year, was created as a fair way to assign students to residencies where they will further their medical training for the next three to five years.

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The match process is an intense and cumbersome one where students fill out long applications and undergo extensive interviews with potential medical programs. The medical centers and students then make their top picks. Based on these preferences, the non-profit National Resident Matching Program uses a computer program to assign students.

Some students will train in general or primary care, while others will pursue medical specialties, such as orthopedics. The day is considered a rite of passage for medical students.

“It represents the culmination in many ways of their incredible work in medical school,” said Dr. Thomas Koenig, associate dean for medical student affairs at Johns Hopkins.

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