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Injured dog saved from Baltimore’s trash incinerator: ‘Donut is now safe, and very lucky to be alive’

BARCS took in this injured dog -- and named him Donut -- after he was discovered on the sorting floor at Wheelabrator, Baltimore's waste-to-energy facility.
BARCS took in this injured dog -- and named him Donut -- after he was discovered on the sorting floor at Wheelabrator, Baltimore's waste-to-energy facility. (courtesy of BARCS/courtesy of BARCS)

A dog was pulled by an alert worker from Baltimore’s trash incinerator Monday morning, filthy and unable to walk and with bite wounds.

The dog was in dire shape and needed emergency care, according to Baltimore Animal Rescue & Care Shelter, which took him in and named him Donut. Nonetheless, the shelter found he had a sweet disposition.

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“Donut’s case is so heartbreaking, but we are remaining positive that he will overcome and find a happy new beginning,” said Bailey Deacon, a spokeswoman for the shelter.

“When he came into our shelter he was so helpless,” Deacon said. "He just sat on the exam room floor folded over in a little lump. Whenever a hand or face got close to his he just wanted to lick it."

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Deacon said Donut was transported to an emergency clinic for treatment and for his wounds to be cleaned of trash and debris. Veterinarians were unable to tell what state he was in before the injuries suffered by falling out of a 30-foot roll-off dumpster during unloading onto the sorting floor of the Wheelabrator waste-to-energy facility in Westport.

A front-end loader operator spotted Donut and jumped into the trash to rescue him, Deacon said.

It’s unknown how he got into the dumpster.

“Could someone have purposely thrown him away in the dumpsters?" Deacon said. "Or did he wander or fall into the dumpster on his own? All we can do is speculate. Whatever the circumstance, sweet Donut is now safe, and very lucky to be alive.”

Donut is among thousands that come to BARCS through an agreement with Baltimore City Animal Control, which responded to Wheelabrator. Last year, the nonprofit shelter BARCS took in about 11,500 animals total from animal control, as strays or surrendered animals.

About 1,000 of them need emergency care, which is funded through partner clinics and a fundraising campaign called the Franky Fund Program. Donut’s two front legs were badly injured and likely need surgery, the shelter said.

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