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People with history of skin cancer still getting sunburned, study finds

A skin mole that should be inspected by a dermatologist.
A skin mole that should be inspected by a dermatologist. (Bartek Tomczyk / Getty Images)

You might think people with a history of nonmelanoma skin cancer would be extra cautious about protecting themselves from the sun.

But recent research by Johns Hopkins scientists found that they are getting risky sunburns at the same rate as those who have never had skin cancer.

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The researchers said in a paper in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology they believe it is because aren't properly using sunscreen and other things to protect them from the sun in the correct way.

The findings were based on information from the National Health Interview Survey, where people answer questions about various health issues. 
The Hopkins researchers said doctors and other providers need to better eduate patients about how to protect their skin.
“It is important to look at how patients are currently practicing sun protection and what they are doing that is not very effective,” Dr. Anna Chien, co-director of the Cutaneous Translational Research Program in the Department of Dermatology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.“ said in a statement. Only then can we make strides in helping patients improve their sun protective practices by ensuring they do them the correct way.”
Sun exposure is the leading cause of nonmelanoma skin cancers. Treatment costs in the United States run about  $4.8 billion a year.
 
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