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Food delivery services move to no-contact system

To minimize social contact, DoorDash, Uber Eats, GrubHub and Postmates have enabled a no-contact delivery system, where couriers leaving food at your door is the new norm.
To minimize social contact, DoorDash, Uber Eats, GrubHub and Postmates have enabled a no-contact delivery system, where couriers leaving food at your door is the new norm. (Bryan Banducci/The New York Times)

A couch potato’s dream: No need to greet your food deliverer at the door anymore.

To minimize social contact, DoorDash, Uber Eats, GrubHub and Postmates have enabled a no-contact delivery system, where couriers leaving food at your door is the new norm.

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Customers can still select the option to have food hand-delivered to them, if they prefer.

The updates come as a result of the latest recommendations from cities and states restricting business operations in hopes of minimizing the spread of the new coronavirus.

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On Friday, Gov. Ron DeSantis limited Florida restaurants to takeout and delivery orders only, banning on-site food and alcohol sales.

There is no evidence of food or food packaging being linked to the spread of COVID-19, according to the FDA.

DoorDash added 100,000 independent restaurants to its DashPass subscription service for free to help generate higher sales, according to a release. The company also waived commission fees for independent restaurants for 30 days and is in the process of shipping more than 1 million sets of hand sanitizer and gloves to its couriers.

UberEats waived delivery fees for independent restaurants during the coronavirus outbreak, and Grubhub has suspended commission payments for independent restaurants nationwide.

Postmates, DoorDash and Uber Eats are offering financial assistance to eligible couriers affected by COVID-19.

DoorDash is also helping communities in need by delivering more than 1 million pounds of groceries and prepared food to food-insecure households.

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