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Bar Vasquez to close in Fells Point, days after Foreman Wolf restaurant group opens Milton Inn

One restaurant opens, another closes.

Bar Vasquez, the Argentine-themed steakhouse and hotspot for weddings and other large-scale events, will serve its last meal on Saturday.

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The news came just days after owners Foreman Wolf re-opened the Milton Inn in Sparks to guests, following a hotly-anticipated takeover. The Roland Park-based restaurant group took over the historic Baltimore County restaurant after it shut down last year at the pandemic’s outset.

In an emailed statement, co-owner Tony Foreman attributed the Bar Vasquez closure to the need to “consolidate our team so that we can fulfill the service standards you expect from us.”

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Bar Vasquez’s most recent executive chef was Mario Cano Catalán, who rose through the ranks at the restaurant group after emigrating to the U.S. from Mexico as a teenager. He began his career as a dishwasher at Charleston. A statement from the company said all staff from Bar Vasquez would be relocated to sister properties.

In addition to the Milton Inn, Foreman Wolf, which Foreman co-owns with ex-wife and chef Cindy Wolf, also owns Cindy Lou’s Fish House in Harbor Point as well as its flagship restaurant, Charleston, and Cinghiale in Harbor East. Their restaurants Johnny’s and Petit Louis are both in Roland Park.

Bar Vasquez restaurant was a rebrand of Pazo, the Spanish-themed property that owners Foreman Wolf opened in the same Fells Point space in 2004. The restaurant was named in homage to Wolf’s mentor, chef Marcelo Vasquez, who was born in Argentina.

In a statement, Foreman reflected on the legacy of Pazo, where he had previously served as executive chef. “Pazo had its own life — as though it was a reasonable creature that took a deep breath and was suddenly a monster in ways unexpected. I recall getting ready for the first night when 600 people were on the reservation books. I was over-excited and admittedly a little scared. I broke down and asked the bar for an ounce (or perhaps a bit more) of whiskey. The spirit had zero effect — too much adrenaline — and away we went off to the races. That restaurant changed my life and I think a few others.”

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The restaurant’s departure leaves vacant an enormous 19th-century warehouse at the edge of Fells Point, near Harbor East. The area has seen numerous other pandemic exits, including Roy’s Restaurant and the James Joyce pub.

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