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Mini Hip-Hop Museum debuting this weekend at Baltimore art gallery

Founded by Milly Vanderwood (pictured), the Mini Hip-Hop Museum at the S.A.N.D. Gallery features original artwork and also magazine clippings from years past.
Founded by Milly Vanderwood (pictured), the Mini Hip-Hop Museum at the S.A.N.D. Gallery features original artwork and also magazine clippings from years past. (Courtesy of the Mini Hip-Hop Museum)

While there are plans to build a hip-hop museum in New York years from now, Baltimore’s Milly Vanderwood didn’t feel like waiting to celebrate his favorite culture.

This weekend, he’s opening the doors to the Mini Hip-Hop Museum, a permanent exhibition inside the S.A.N.D. Gallery near downtown. Located on the second floor of 823 E. Baltimore St., the space is covered in original art inspired by hip-hop, vintage magazine covers, concert tickets and other artifacts and ephemera he and his team have collected over the years.

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The goal of the museum is “just to give people a chance to physically see art dedicated to hip-hop, and preserve hip-hop culture,” Vanderwood said.

Tate Kobang, Future Islands, Al Rogers Jr. and other Baltimore-based artists all released excellent new music in 2017.

The weekend will feature panel discussions, music production workshops and other events at the museum. (For the full schedule, click here.)

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Last August, Vanderwood launched a Gofundme page to raise money for a standalone museum space not connected to the S.A.N.D. Gallery, which he also runs. While that’s still his ambition — it is currently well short of its $10,000 goal — Vanderwood decided to use the S.A.N.D. Gallery in the mean time.

The Mini Hip-Hop Museum aims to celebrate all eras, both mainstream and underground, of the culture and its music, he said. It’s a work in progress — it could use more pieces representing the beginning years of hip-hop in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s, he said.

Merriweather Post Pavilion, the celebrated Columbia music venue, plans to be ready for its early spring start after its roof collapsed over the weekend, said Audrey Fix Schaefer.

“There’s more research to do,” Vanderwood said. “I want to make sure it’s right.”

The Mini Hip-Hop Museum, located at the S.A.N.D. Gallery, is open on weekends starting at 2 p.m. (closing time is to be determined, and based on what events are happening). During the week, visits are by appointment only. For more information, go to instagram.com/minihiphopmuseum.

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